Category Archives: hike

The week

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Last week of school. The girls all took off for GJ on Monday and came back on Tuesday. They stayed at Zack’s house and I sent Evelyn a jar of dandelion syrup and she sent back 2 dozen eggs from her chickens. Jack and I went to the antique store that finally reopened, it’s pretty big and they have a lot of root beer.

I took Jack for a walk at Hildebrand ranch, we didn’t get very far because it started raining.

I took care of the critters while the girls were done and Peanut smiled at me.

I had the eye doc redo my glasses and Hannah had the quickest braces appointment ever. Wednesday I went to walk with Walk2Connect and drop off some food for the seniors. Jack was walking pretty fast, so he was dragging at the end.

The Depression era bake was vinegar pie (which made it taste like it had lemon in it.) It was a very good custard type pie, but I think the oven was too hot (I found another recipe that says 350 for 50-60 min.)

OLD FASHIONED VINEGAR PIE

4 large eggs
1 stick salted butter, melted
1½ cup sugar
2 Tbs apple cider vinegar
¼ tsp cinnamon
1 tsp vanilla
1 unbaked 9 inch pie crust

Preheat oven to 425 F

Combine all ingredients and beat until mixture is slightly fluffy
Pour into pie crust and bake for 30 minutes, or until center is set. Note: Center will set just a bit once removed from the oven.
Cool before serving and enjoy!

We took Jack to the dog park and he had so much fun.

Grace did some chalk art.

My yard is full of dandelions.

School is done! We binged watched all 3 Back to the Future’s! Today we’re making tiny cakes to practice some cake decorating.

Thoughts on tiny cakes – they are hard to frost! They don’t do well with rock candy making a geode cake. Chocolate candy bars are not the same thing as melted chocolate. Chocolate and cream cheese frosting are not good friends when you mix them. Hannah used way too much frosting. Cupcakes are probably a better option.

 

Weekend drives

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Saturday we drove to Garden of the gods and then found the What Would Cheesus Do? Food truck.

Doodle.

Sunday I watched church on-line, then we drove to Pueblo to eat Bingo Burger and hike around.

From church –
-To be rich toward God acknowledges that everything we have comes from God.
-Using those riches means making an effort to use what God has given us for the good of others and for the glory of God.
-Jesus shows us where our priorities should lie –
His mission was to bring the good news to the least of these, our mission is the same.

Dinners for the week – bday dinner, sweet potato shepherd’s pie, pizza take out (are you supporting local food businesses that are closed to dining?), chicken parmesan with farfalle, green chile beef posole stew, grilled sausage with mac and cheese, beef stroganoff with peas.

Sweet potato shepherd’s pie

For the potatoes:
1-1/2 lbs sweet potatoes, peeled, diced
3 cloves garlic
1/2 cup 1% milk
1/4 cup fat free chicken broth*
2 tbsp reduced fat sour cream
salt and pepper to taste

For the filling:
1 lb 93% lean ground turkey (or beef, lamb, etc)
1 tsp olive oil
1 medium onion, diced
1 parsnip, diced (you can leave this out if you want)
2 cloves garlic, diced
8 oz mushrooms, diced
10 oz frozen mixed vegetables (or just peas or just carrots)
2 tbsp flour, leave out to make gluten-free
1 cup fat-free low-sodium chicken broth*
2 tsp tomato paste
1 tsp Worcestershire sauce
1 tsp freshly chopped rosemary
salt and pepper
paprika

Boil sweet potatoes and garlic in a pot of salted water until cooked and soft. Drain and mash with chicken broth, sour cream, salt and pepper.
Preheat oven to 400°F.
In a large saute pan brown turkey; season with salt and pepper. When cooked, set aside on a plate.
Add olive oil to the pan, then add the onion and sauté one minute. Add the parsnip, salt and pepper to taste; cook about 12 minutes, until celery is soft. Add garlic and mushrooms; sauté another 3-4 minutes. Add flour, salt and pepper and mix well. Add frozen vegetables, chicken broth, tomato paste, Worcestershire sauce, rosemary, cooked turkey, and mix well.
Simmer on low about 5-10 minutes.
In casserole dish spread the meat mixture on the bottom and top each with mashed sweet potatoes. Use a fork to scrape the top of the potatoes to make ridges; sprinkle with paprika.
Bake 20 minutes or until potatoes turn golden. Remove from oven and let it cool 10 minutes before serving.

Grand Junction

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We got started about 9:30 for the drive and we were taking our time. Stopping as needed, grabbing a coffee, then lunch, so we made it into GJ about 3pm.

We headed to the dog boarding to drop Jack at Tiny town (we needed a sitter so we could go to dinner, but he stayed overnight because we were going to late picking him up.) Bethany came by the hotel and we went over to Delta for dinner with Zach (her BF) and his parents. Delta closes up early, even on a Friday, but we walked around anyway.

 

We had drinks at the hotel when we got back and watched TV for a bit.

Saturday morning we had breakfast then went to hike the Mica mine trail. James and I had to turn around when it got icy, but the girls went all the way to the mine and picked up some mica and quartz. Jack had fun!

The girls and I went to lunch at a brewery while James and Jack chilled at the hotel. Then we walked around downtown to the shops and antique store.

Hannah napped while Grace and Bethany went to make a candle. They headed off to dinner and a performance of Fiddler on the Roof while James, Jack and I watched some TV while eating pizza and wings. Jack was patient while we had cocktails in the lobby.

Feb miles 43.29

Sunday morning we ran Jack around with his ball till he passed out.

The girls met us for breakfast and we packed up and headed out to the Skinner trail in Fruita for a quick hike before leaving.

We said bye to Bethany, she had some work to finish up for English before going to work. Our drive home was nice, we went slow, had lunch and got home before the snow started.

The week -school, field trip Yesterado, date night, Police explorers, field trip Little Shop of Horrors, youth group, church work, first Friday art walk, WOTR teacher training, church, hike.

Dinners – Out, chicken mole and avocado salad, bbq stuffed potatoes, chicken teriyaki and cabbage slaw, Food truck nite, grilling stuff, hamburger patties with mushrooms and onions with broccoli and salad.

 

One of those weeks

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Since Monday was a holiday, James was home and school didn’t start yet. It kind of threw off my week because every day felt like it should be the day before. Monday we drove to Fort Collins and found a place that had outdoor seating (for Jack.) They had some good poutine and sliders. It was right next to Insomnia cookies, so we had to try them. Those cookies were huge, warm and so good.

We went to a park and walked around the pond. I thought it was the same pond the girls and I had been to in the Summer, but this was Prospect ponds and the other was Riverbend ponds.

Tuesday we had to take Mousse to the vet for an abscess on his cheek. They cut it and drained it and gave us some meds. It’s really hard to give meds to a rat and clean his face. I also saw my cardiologist and she said my EF was up to 60% (75% is good/normal) and dropped 1 of my BP pills to 1 time a day (instead of 2.) This should help with the dizziness. She left the beta blocker and rest of the meds as is and said to check back in a year.

Hannah had her Police Explorer meeting, but they didn’t tell her it was at a different location, so we went to the Police station, then had to drive back to Parker arts. Wednesday I drove Grace to Vail to sit in on a lecture about Gore creek and the bugs/water quality. Turns out the guy giving the presentation is one of the people who checks River Watch bug samples. So, that was cool.

Wednesday was also One Night at youth group and the girls invited some friends to come. There was an ice cream bar, games, prizes and inflatables. Thursday I dropped James at work, took Jack to the dog park and then the vet. He’s been super itchy and after a skin test they don’t know why. They gave me a liquid to put on him that will kill anything (if there is anything to kill) and a medicated shampoo that should help with the itching. I think he’s going to be the cleanest dog on the block pretty soon.

We did some school then Grace and I met a friend and her kids at the river. They wanted to see what sampling looked like and see a test, so we grabbed water and did DO. The sky from up to downstream and right to left bank looks very different.

I took Jack to the dog park again, and then he got a bath.

Today we’re catching up on school and then heading to the MCA for tiny hibachi and mariachi.

Well, the grill (and food) was tiny.

The exhibit downstairs was really cool.

2020

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In 2020 I resolve to pray more, walk, hike, plan field trips, take time for myself, learn something new, go on date nights with my hubby, volunteer, teach my kids, let my kids do things without me, keep my house tidy (but not exasperatingly clean), take more pictures, make some art, dance with joy and have 0 hospital stays.

We put up all the Christmas stuff this morning, I cleaned up a bit more, changed the mantle, swept and cleared the table and banister. Hannah made chocolate chip pancakes for breakfast and then she, Malia and Grace went to Main Event to bowl. When they got home Grace went with us to our New Year’s hike at Phillip Miller park in Castle Rock.

Then back home to listen to jazz, read and book dinner.

Wed, Thur, Fri

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#famouswomen

Alice Coachman 1923-2014

At the 1948 London Olympics, Alice Coachman won the high jump for the United States, becoming the first black woman to win an Olympic Gold medal. King George VI awarded her medal, and subsequently, President Harry S. Truman congratulated her at a White House ceremony. Coachman was also celebrated in a motorcade that traveled from Atlanta to her hometown of Albany, Georgia.

As a child, Coachman was forbidden from training at athletic fields with white people, which forced her to get creative: she would use ropes and sticks as high jumps, running barefoot. Despite these barriers, she was able to be the first black woman to win an Olympic medal and the first black person to receive an endorsement deal.

“If I had gone to the Games and failed, there wouldn’t be anyone to follow in my footsteps. It encouraged the rest of the women to work harder and fight harder,” Coachman told The New York Times in 1996. And indeed, she paved the way for African-American athletes like Wilma Rudolph, Evelyn Ashford, Florence Griffith Joyner, and many more.

Dog school.

We tried to go sit in on a court case, but the only open ones said ‘No children’ and this one looked like it had a case on the docket, but no one showed up. The clerk said to come earlier next time.

My Harriet hike was at the gym because I waited too long and it got dark and cold.

#famouswomen

Rosalind Franklin 1920-1958

Rosalind Elsie Franklin was born in London, England. Her family was well-to-do and both sides were very involved in social and public works. Rosalind was extremely intelligent and she knew by the age of 15 that she wanted to be a scientist. Her father actively discouraged her interest since it was very difficult for women to have such a career. However, with her excellent education from St. Paul’s Girls’ School, one of the few institutions at the time that taught physics and chemistry to girls, Franklin entered Cambridge University in 1938 to study chemistry.

Franklin’s next career move took her to Paris. An old friend introduced her to Marcel Mathieu who directed most of the research in France. He was impressed with Franklin’s work and offered her a job as a “chercheur” in the Laboratoire Central des Services Chimiques de l’Etat. Here she learned X-ray diffraction techniques from Jacques Mering.
In 1951, With her knowledge, Franklin was to set up and improve the X-ray crystallography unit at King’s College. Maurice Wilkins was already using X-ray crystallography to try to solve the DNA problem at King’s College. Franklin arrived while Wilkins was away and on his return, Wilkins assumed that she was hired to be his assistant. It was a bad start to a relationship that never got any better.

Working with a student, Raymond Gosling, Franklin was able to get two sets of high-resolution photos of crystallized DNA fibers. She used two different fibers of DNA, one more highly hydrated than the other. From this she deduced the basic dimensions of DNA strands, and that the phosphates were on the outside of what was probably a helical structure.
She presented her data at a lecture in King’s College at which James Watson was in attendance. Watson and Crick were at the Cavendish Laboratory and had been working on solving the DNA structure. Franklin did not know Watson and Crick as well as Wilkins did and never truly collaborated with them. It was Wilkins who showed Watson and Crick the X-ray data Franklin obtained. The data confirmed the 3-D structure that Watson and Crick had theorized for DNA. In 1953, both Wilkins and Franklin published papers on their X-ray data in the same Nature issue with Watson and Crick’s paper on the structure of DNA.

Franklin left Cambridge in 1953 and went to the Birkbeck lab to work on the structure of tobacco mosaic virus. She published a number of papers on the subject and she actually did a lot of the work while suffering from cancer. She died from cancer in 1958. In 1962, the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded to James Watson, Francis Crick, and Maurice Wilkins for solving the structure of DNA. The Nobel committee does not give posthumous prizes.

The girl went to a cooking class (pumpkin pasta, salad and homemade ranch dressing) so I took Jack for a Harriet hike along the Cherry creek trail, it was cold.

#famouswomen

Elizabeth Blackwell 1821-1910

The first woman in America to receive a medical degree, Elizabeth Blackwell championed the participation of women in the medical profession and ultimately opened her own medical college for women. Born near Bristol, England on February 3, 1821, Blackwell was the third of nine children of Hannah Lane and Samuel Blackwell, a sugar refiner, Quaker, and anti-slavery activist. Blackwell’s famous relatives included brother Henry, a well-known abolitionist and women’s suffrage supporter who married women’s rights activist Lucy Stone; Emily Blackwell, who followed her sister into medicine; and sister-in-law Antoinette Brown Blackwell, the first ordained female minister in a mainstream Protestant denomination.

In 1832, the Blackwell family moved to America, settling in Cincinnati, Ohio. In 1838, Samuel Blackwell died, leaving the family penniless during a national financial crisis. Blackwell was inspired to pursue medicine by a dying friend who said her ordeal would have been better had she had a female physician. Most male physicians trained as apprentices to experienced doctors; there were few medical colleges and none that accepted women, though a few women also apprenticed and became unlicensed physicians.

While teaching, Blackwell boarded with the families of two southern physicians who mentored her. In 1847, she returned to Philadelphia, hoping that Quaker friends could assist her entrance into medical school. Rejected everywhere she applied, she was ultimately admitted to Geneva College in rural New York, however, her acceptance letter was intended as a practical joke.

Blackwell faced discrimination and obstacles in college: professors forced her to sit separately at lectures and often excluded her from labs; local townspeople shunned her as a “bad” woman for defying her gender role. Blackwell eventually earned the respect of professors and classmates, graduating first in her class in 1849. She continued her training at London and Paris hospitals, though doctors there relegated her to midwifery or nursing. She began to emphasize preventative care and personal hygiene, recognizing that male doctors often caused epidemics by failing to wash their hands between patients.

In 1851, Dr. Blackwell returned to New York City, where discrimination against female physicians meant few patients and difficulty practicing in hospitals and clinics. With help from Quaker friends, Blackwell opened a small clinic to treat poor women; in 1857, she opened the New York Infirmary for Women and Children with her sister Dr. Emily Blackwell and colleague Dr. Marie Zakrzewska. Its mission included providing positions for women physicians. During the Civil War, the Blackwell sisters trained nurses for Union hospitals.

In 1868, Blackwell opened a medical college in New York City. A year later, she placed her sister in charge and returned permanently to London, where in 1875, she became a professor of gynecology at the new London School of Medicine for Women. She also helped found the National Health Society and published several books, including an autobiography, Pioneer Work in Opening the Medical Profession to Women (1895).

Friday it snowed.

After school I took Jack to the HIgh line canal for a walk.

He was nappy after that.

Weekend

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Hedy Lamarr – born Hedwig Eva Maria Kiesler 1914-2000

The Hollywood actress was an avid inventor and the person behind advances in communication technology in the 1940s that led to today’s Wi-Fi, GPS, and Bluetooth.

Like many famous stars of her day, she had a relationship with aerospace pioneer Howard Hughes. According to Dean’s film, it was more cerebral than romantic — she helped him streamline his aircraft design. In rare, long-lost cassette tapes from the 1990s, Lamarr describes her contributions to aerospace engineering: “I thought the aeroplanes were too slow. I decided that’s not right. They shouldn’t be square, the wings. So I bought a book of fish, and I bought a book of birds, and then used the fastest bird, connected it with the fastest fish. And I drew it together and showed it to Howard Hughes and then he said, ‘You’re a genius.’”Although better known for her Silver Screen exploits, She was a famous Hollywood star who would finish performing on set with Clark Gable, Jimmy Stewart, and Spencer Tracy, and then go back to her trailer and work on her inventions.

Austrian actress Hedy Lamarr became a pioneer in the field of wireless communications following her emigration to the United States. The international beauty icon developed a “Secret Communications System” to help combat the Nazis in World War II. The brilliant idea was called frequency hopping: a way of jumping around on radio frequencies in order to avoid a third party jamming your signal. Lamarr invented it in the 1940s for use as a secret wartime communication system that could keep the enemy from interfering with a ship’s torpedoes. She got a patent for it in August 1942, and then donated it to the U.S. military to help fight the Nazis. “When she gave it to them, [the Navy] said, ‘What do you want to do, put a player piano inside a torpedo? Get out of here!’ And so they didn’t use it during the Second World War. It was after the Second World War that it emerged as a way of secretly communicating on all the gadgets that we use today,” Dean explained.

By manipulating radio frequencies at irregular intervals between transmission and reception, the invention formed an unbreakable code to prevent classified messages from being intercepted by enemy personnel. The enormous significance of the invention was not realized until decades later. It was first implemented on naval ships during the Cuban Missile Crisis and subsequently emerged in numerous military applications. But most importantly, the “spread spectrum” technology that Lamarr helped to invent would galvanize the digital communications boom, forming the technical backbone that makes cellular phones, fax machines and other wireless operations possible.

Saturday we had plans, Dim Sum! We got there right at 10am and were in the back of the line, but we made it into the first seating.

We ran errands, went by the library, put up a shelf, got a new headlight and the girls and I went to a free concert – The Composer is Dead by Lemony Snicket.

James and I walked with Jack at Marcy park for a Harriet hike. My knees felt awesome!

Sunday –

#famouswomen
Sybil Ludington 1761-1839

A young American patriot, Sybil Ludington was just 16 years old when she made a night-time ride rallying Patriot soldiers.

Born in New York in 1761, Ludington was the eldest of Henry and Abigail’s twelve children. In addition to working as a farmer, Ludington’s father was a gristmill owner who served in the military for over sixty years, including during the French and Indian War. He was loyal to the British crown until 1773, when he switched sides and joined the Patriots in the American Revolution.

On April 26, 1777, Colonel Ludington received word from a rider that the nearby town of Danbury was under attack by British troops and needed help. At the time, Ludington’s regiment had disbanded for planting season, and his men were miles apart at their respective farms. With the rider too tired to continue and Colonel Ludington focused on preparing for battle, young Sybil rose to the cause. She rode all night through dark woods and in the rain, covering anywhere from 20 to 40 miles (estimates vary). By the time she returned home, hundreds of soldiers were gathering to fight the British. She was thanked by General George Washington himself, but it wasn’t until 1935 when a statue was erected in her honor that she was publicly recognized.

We went to church, Hannah worked the coffee shop, while I sat in on the next giving sermon. James grilled for lunch and Jack got a tiny cheeseburger.

Our Harriet hike today was from Belleview park to the dog park and back.

We watched some TV, made a post office run and saw this amazing sunset.

Things this week – CT scan, school, St. John’s music at noon, Pixar field trip, Union station jazz date night, Creativity club, Pupsgiving doggy day camp, youth group, RiNo pop-up field trip, TNO, HS skate, ortho, Sam’s going away at EG, ?, working at Riize and church.

Dinners this week – leftovers, navy beans and sausage with rye bread, date night (TV dinners for kids), cheese and tomato lasagna and salad, TNO (tamales for me, potstickers for kids), basil chicken with parmesan vermicelli and artichokes, meatloaf and smashed potatoes.

Smashed potatoes

24 ounces Dutch yellow baby potatoes
2 tablespoons olive oil
3 cloves garlic, pressed
1 tablespoon fresh thyme leaves
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

Preheat oven to 450 degrees F. Lightly oil a baking sheet or coat with nonstick spray. In a large pot of boiling water, cook potatoes until tender, about 15-20 minutes; drain well.
Place potatoes onto the prepared baking sheet. Using a potato masher or fork, carefully smash the potatoes until flattened but still in one piece. Top with olive oil, garlic and thyme. Place into oven and bake for 18-20 minutes, or until golden brown and crisp.
Serve immediately.

 

Ride along, CBI field trip

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Rachel Carson – 1907-1964

When marine biologist Rachel Carson published Silent Spring in 1962, she changed the way we think about the environment. Throughout her life, Carson showed talent in both writing and the sciences; Carson earned a master’s degree in zoology from Johns Hopkins University in 1932 and began working as an aquatic biologist in the U.S. Bureau of Fisheries. She earned a National Book Award for her 1951 book The Sea Around Us, but it was Silent Spring that launched her into a role as a literary celebrity and reformer.

Silent Spring exposed environmental issues to the U.S. public for the first time. Carson documented the adverse effects of synthetic pesticides for humans and wildlife, revealed that the chemical industry was spreading lies and misinformation, and accused U.S. officials of negligence in accepting the use of pesticides without fully examining the harmful effects. Carson’s book outraged the public and led to a nationwide ban on DDT, a cancer-causing insecticide. The Environmental Protection Agency also owes its existence to Carson’s influence, as her book caused citizens and the government to be more environmentally conscious.

School today – Practical math (combinations and permutations, also finished population regression models), Chemistry (periodic table), Forensics (footwear and tire marks), British Lit (writing to a prompt)

English (complex or flat characters), Algebra (functions), World history (China’s Song and Tang dynasties), Astronomy (inner planets), Earth science (Earth’s history), Criminal justice (evaluating justice ethics)

https://www.ptable.com/
https://www.history.com/topics/ancient-china/tang-dynasty
https://www.starchitect.net/
http://www.forensicsciencesimplified.org/fwtt/how.html

Hannah went for her afternoon ride along, Officer P had a good afternoon. They pulled over 2 cars, went to a 911 call, went to check on an abandoned car and responded to 2 hotel calls.

Hannah liked the officer and said the afternoon ride along was a lot better than the morning one. Jack and I went on a cold Harriet hike.

Thursday –

#famouswomen

Ada Lovelace: The First Computer Programmer
1815–1852

Ada Lovelace was the only legitimate daughter of Lord Byron, one of England’s most famous poets. Her parents separated shortly after Ada’s birth, and Byron left England. He died in Greece a few years later. Although she never knew her father, Byron’s legacy greatly influenced Ada’s upbringing. Her mother was paranoid that she would inherit her poet father’s erratic temperament, and made sure that she was tutored in mathematics and science.

At the age of 12, Lovelace conceptualized a flying machine.
After studying the anatomy of birds and the suitability of various materials, the young girl illustrated plans to construct a winged flying apparatus before moving on to think about powered flight. “I have got a scheme,” she wrote to her mother, “to make a thing in the form of a horse with a steam engine in the inside so contrived as to move an immense pair of wings, fixed on the outside of the horse, in such a manner as to carry it up into the air while a person sits on its back.”

When Ada was 17, her mentor Charles Babbage showed her the prototype for his ‘Difference Engine,’ the world’s first computer. In 1842, Babbage asked Lovelace to help translate an article about the plans for his newest machine, the ‘Analytical Engine.’ She appended a lengthy set of notes to her translation, in which she wrote an algorithm that the engine could use to compute Bernoulli numbers.

While the extent of her original contribution is disputed, her code is now considered the world’s first computer program. Lovelace foresaw the multi-purpose functionality of the modern computer. Although Babbage believed the use of his machines was confined to numerical calculations, she mused that any piece of content—including music, text, pictures and sounds—could be translated to digital form and manipulated by machine. Lovelace wrote that the analytical engine “might act upon other things besides number, were objects found whose mutual fundamental relations could be expressed by those of the abstract science of operations… Supposing, for instance, that the fundamental relations of pitched sounds in the science of harmony and of musical composition were susceptible of [mathematical] expression and adaptations, the engine might compose elaborate and scientific pieces of music of any degree of complexity or extent.”

After school we went to the CBI Forensic lab on a field trip with school (we use an on-line K12 school, Destinations Career Academy of Colorado.)

Jack and I went on a sunset Harriet hike.

Friday –

#famouswomen

Sarojini Naidu 1879-1949

Sarojini Naidu, also known as Sarojini Chattopadhyaya, was a famous Indian poet and a major freedom fighter who went on becoming the first Indian woman to be appointed the president of the Indian National Congress and the Governor of any state in India. Most of all, she was a noted child prodigy and a master of children’s literature. Naidu was given a sobriquet Bharat Kokila (The Nightingale of India) on account of her beautiful poems and songs. Some of her best books that established her as a potent writer include The Golden Threshold, The Gift of India, and The Broken Wing.

An active participant of the Indian Independence movement, Naidu joined the national movement taking Gandhi’s call and joined him in the popular Salt March to Dandi. With the Indian Independence in 1947, Sarojini Naidu was made the Governor of the Uttar Pradesh in the wake of her contribution to the movement.

We did school and I went to the doc to get knee shots. Wow, it was a bit painful at first, but by the evening it was better. Jack and I went to Chatfield for a Harriet hike.

Then we went to see the horses around Highlands Ranch.

Planetarium and Garden of the gods

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Famous women

Irena Sendler’s heroic actions were forgotten by most of the world until 2000, when four girls at Uniontown High School in Kansas decided to research her life as part of a history assignment.

Sendler was a Polish Catholic, and her surgeon father raised her to think of the Jewish people as equals. When the Nazis invaded in 1939, she was working as an administrator in the Warsaw Social Welfare Department, where homeless people and orphans were provided with food and shelter. Sendler immediately decided, on her own initiative, to begin a covert mission to supply food, medicine, and money to any Jews in need of them. She knew this would be illegal under Nazi rule, so she signed the Jews up under Christian names. To keep the authorities away, she told them that anyone who was signed up to receive aid had highly infectious typhus. While the Jews lived under false identities, Sendler kept their real ones in jars buried under an apple tree in her neighbor’s yard.

Once the Warsaw Ghetto was established, the Jews inside began dying at a rate of 5,000 per month from starvation or disease. Sendler entered the ghetto daily disguised as a nurse, convincing Jewish parents to let her smuggle their children to safety. She is credited with personally saving the lives of 2,500 children, spiriting them out of the ghetto under false names and giving them to adoptive families, orphanages, and convents. She hid some in wheelbarrows full of clothes or food and gave one infant to a man to smuggle out in his toolbox. Others were taken out hidden in coffins and burlap potato sacks.

On October 20, 1943, the Gestapo finally figured out what Irena was up to and arrested her. They smashed her feet and legs until all the bones were broken, but she refused to divulge any names. They sentenced her to death, but her friends bribed one of the guards to let her go, and she spent the rest of the war in hiding. ​After the war she dug up the jars and used the notes to track down the 2,500 children she placed with adoptive families and to reunite them with relatives scattered across Europe. But most lost their families during the Holocaust in Nazi death camps.

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We dropped Jack at puppy daycare and went to the Air Force Planetarium for the Eclipses and phases of the moon show. I had 13 families sign up (it was free), but only 6 show up (lots of excuses, but really when things are free people tend to wake up and go – oh, I don’t feel like driving, waking up my kids, etc.)

Anyway, the show was great, it was cool to see a visual of the phases of the moon and how eclipses happen. After the show we had another 40 minutes of general astronomy, the night sky, flying around to different planets and flying around Colorado with Google maps (but on a 50ft dome screen, so it looked neat.) After the shows some people stayed there to eat lunch, some came back for the next free show (Auroras), some went hiking. We went to lunch, then to Garden of the gods for a Harriet hike.

Back at home we made dinner and then Hannah went to Police Explorers. They were talking about theft, robbery, domestic violence and various other crimes. That’s two meetings down, three to go to be vetted to getting in the group and getting a uniform.

Trunk or Treat, SNOW, Opera, Halloween, Harriet hikes, weekend

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Sunday was Trunk or Treat at church, snow had started falling, so they made the decision to have it indoors. Jack went as a dinosaur and the girls were helping with the kids games.

Jack ended up sleeping on my lap for almost the whole time. James was settled in Vegas by this time, getting ready for the start of his conference. It started to snow, so after getting some groceries we stayed in for the night.

Goings on – James at conference, school, shovel snow…repeat, Fox theater DOTD show, Barber of Seville opera, youth group, Halloween party, Harriet hike co-op, art walk, Night at the Museums, church, working at church.

Dinners this week – Mac and cheese with chipotle chicken sausage, beef taco soup, grilled cheese and tomato soup, sushi and dumplings, chicken fajitas, tikka masala meatballs with fried garbanzo beans, grilling stuff.

Monday morning, I heard the traffic was horrible. Lots of wrecks, icy streets, we stayed home.

We got Jack’s photos in from the pet parade, this one is cute.

This one, not so much.

This one is mine!

Jack had a lazy snow day.

We didn’t get the amount of snow that they thought, only 4 inches or so. But, another round of snow was coming on Tuesday/Wed. It came earlier than people thought, so some schools started the day on time, but ended early. Some schools took a snow day and CDOT was telling people that if they could leave work early (or not come into work at all), this was the day to do it. We had nowhere to be, so we just chilled at home.

We ended up with a few more inches, so maybe 7 total. Wednesday was our DOTD show, but I had stayed up watching the news and Aurora and Denver both called a snow day for Wednesday, so I knew the show would be canceled – it was.

Hannah was aching to get out, so we went to the mall. Youth group was canceled, and I was wondering if the Opera would be too – but it wasn’t.

Barber of Seville was amazing. The singing, the acting, the set and costumes – brilliant. Our student matinee seats were $12/15 and I looked up the price of our seats for the next show, $225 each – who can afford that?!

Thursday we did school and went to the library for a Halloween party. The girls trick or treated with M at night and we went to the Mansion for last stop.

Friday was my Harriet Tubman co-op and the first day of Harriet hikes (Girl Trek and Walk2Connect are doing 30 days of Harriet hikes to promote the movie.) We read 2 books about Harriet, watched a video, listened to a song and did some worksheet activities. We talked about slavery, the North and South, the Underground Railroad, Talking quilts, codes and the things that Harriet Tubman did that she’s not really know for like – Union spy, a leader of an Army mission to free 700 slaves, a nurse, and a suffragist among other things. After eating some hoe cakes we went outside in the cloudy 34 degree weather and walked around the lake. This story is about the awesome trek some of the GT people made walking in the footsteps of Harriet Tubman.
https://ideas.ted.com/what-we-learned-from-walking-in-the-…/

I’m also going to be posting each day of the month about women that you should know, some of them may be familiar (like Harriet Tubman), some may have done great things – but you never heard of them.

My knees were frozen, so they didn’t hurt until late when I thawed out. We went home and Hannah went to a birthday party, Bethany had come home to visit and Grace and I gathered stuff for the Art Walk. It was only getting colder as we set up a table and Grace put her stuff on it. We got a square so it would be easier to sell things, because no one has cash anymore. She sold two mini-canvases before James showed up. Jack was wrapped up in my coat and falling asleep, but then woke up when he heard James. We grabbed some dinner from the food trucks and braved the cold for a bit longer before heading home.

Saturday -I wasn’t going to do Mrs. Ford today, but it’s appropriate because tonight is Denver’s Night at the Museums and if you haven’t been to the Black American West museum, it’s free tonight. Also, there was a tidbit in the news about her house (the museum.)

Justina Ford: Denver’s First Female African American Doctor

Justina Laurena Warren was born on January 22, 1871 in Knoxville, Illinois. Justina’s love for medicine was clear at a young age; she often dissected frogs and followed her mother, a nurse, when she saw patients. Justina went to Hering Medical School in Chicago. She married John Ford, a Baptist minister, in 1892. She continued her studies and graduated from medical school in 1899.

After her graduation, Justina was denied her medical license. The license examiner told her, “I feel dishonest taking a fee from you. You’ve got two strikes against you to begin with. First of all, you’re a lady, and second, you’re colored.” When she and John moved to Denver, racial discrimination prohibited Ford from joining the Colorado Medical Association or practicing in a hospital. So, she set up a practice in her home at 2335 Arapahoe Street.

Justina treated anyone who needed medical care, regardless of race, gender, language, citizenship, or ability to pay. Many of her patients were poor whites, African-Americans, and non-English speaking immigrants who were turned away from hospitals. Ford learned multiple languages to help treat her patients. Her patients paid her in goods, services, or money. It wasn’t until 1950 that Dr. Ford was allowed into the Colorado and American Medical Associations. Even then, she was the only female African-American doctor in all of Denver. Ford continued caring for patients until two weeks before her death on October 14, 1952. By the end of her life she had delivered almost 7,000 babies. Dr. Justina Ford’s house is now the home of the Black American West Museum.

We went to Casa Bonita for lunch and it occured to me that Casa Bonita and I will both turn 50 in just over 3 years. I had my 40th b-day party at Chuck E Cheese’s, so Casa Bonita would be a step up (I think.)

Sunday Hannah was so excited to bring her coffee painting to church (and to work at the coffee shop) that she and Bethany walked there, early, like super early, like no one was at the church early. So, James went and picked them up and they had coffee at Starbucks. Later, I took Hannah back to church and she made me a ghostly peppermint latte.

Phil was preaching on being generous.

Famous woman of the day – Wu Zetian – born 624 BC

She was the only female emperor in Chinese history. She used every ounce of her political skills and pulled Machiavellian maneuvers to gain and maintain her power. In dynastic China, Confucius deemed women unfit to rule. Nevertheless, Wu Zetian rose through the ranks in Chinese society. Wu’s intellect and beauty attracted Emperor Tai Tsung, who recruited her to his court as his concubine. After the emperor’s death, his son Kao Tsung succeeded him. Kao Tsung had been having an affair with Wu even before the death of his father. She became his second wife—a large step up from concubine—after his ascension.

Emperor Kao Tsung later died from a stroke, and Empress Wu began administrative duties in the court, eliminating and spying on those who posed an obstacle to her, and putting her youngest son into power. When her son stepped down in 690, Wu was crowned emperor of China. As emperor, Wu truly did effect change in China. She gave government positions to qualified scholars, reduced the army’s size, lowered unfair taxes on peasants, and increased agricultural production.

Bethany and Grace went to lunch by themselves, so James, Hannah and I went to Shake Shack. Back at home we watched some TV, went grocery shopping and James and I got out to my Harriet hike at Fly’n B park.

Dinners this week – rosemary pan fried chicken and risotto, beef stew, chicken quesadilla, cheeseburger macaroni, cheesy chicken and rice casserole, chinese chicken soup, black beans and sausage. (Chicken was on sale.)

Chinese Chicken Soup

2 tablespoons sesame oil
1/2 teaspoon ground turmeric
2 teaspoons chopped fresh ginger root
2 tablespoons chile paste
1 pound chopped cooked chicken breast
1 quart chicken broth
2 teaspoons sugar
1/4 cup soy sauce
1 cup chopped celery
1 (3 ounce) package ramen noodles (or egg noddles or any quick cook noodle)
1/2 cup chopped green onion

In a large pot, heat oil over medium heat. Cook turmeric, ginger and chile paste in oil until fragrant, 1 to 2 minutes. Stir in chicken, broth, sugar, soy sauce and celery. Bring to a boil, then introduce noodles and cook until noodles are done. Serve garnished with green onions.

Goings on this week – school, taxonomy co-op at the zoo, HS skate, AF Planetarium field trip, Garden of the gods hike, Parker Police Explorers, GV ride-along (Hannah), youth group, CBI forensic field trip, dentist, Riize coffee shop, Mountainview coffee shop, church, HR concert band concert.