TDO, food drive, symphony

#famouswomen

Mary McLeod Bethune 1875-1955

The daughter of former slaves, Mary Jane McLeod Bethune became one of the most important black educators, civil and women’s rights leaders and government officials of the twentieth century. The college she founded set educational standards for today’s black colleges, and her role as an advisor to President Franklin Delano Roosevelt gave African Americans an advocate in government.

Born on July 10, 1875 near Maysville, South Carolina, Bethune was one of the last of Samuel and Patsy McLeod’s seventeen children. After the Civil War, her mother worked for her former owner until she could buy the land on which the family grew cotton. By age nine, Bethune could pick 250 pounds of cotton a day.

Bethune benefited from efforts to educate African Americans after the war, graduating in 1894 from the Scotia Seminary, a boarding school in North Carolina. Bethune next attended Dwight Moody’s Institute for Home and Foreign Missions in Chicago, Illinois. But with no church willing to sponsor her as a missionary, Bethune became an educator. While teaching in South Carolina, she married fellow teacher Albertus Bethune, with whom she had a son in 1899. In 1904 Bethune opened a boarding school, the Daytona Beach Literary and Industrial School for Training Negro Girls. Eventually, Bethune’s school became a college, merging with the all-male Cookman Institute to form Bethune-Cookman College in 1929. It issued its first degrees in 1943.

A champion of racial and gender equality, Bethune founded many organizations and led voter registration drives after women gained the vote in 1920, risking racist attacks. In 1924, she was elected president of the National Association of Colored Women’s Clubs, and in 1935, she became the founding president of the National Council of Negro Women. A friend of Eleanor Roosevelt, in 1936, Bethune became the highest ranking African American woman in government when President Franklin Roosevelt named her director of Negro Affairs of the National Youth Administration, where she remained until 1944. She was also a leader of FDR’s unofficial “black cabinet.” In 1937 Bethune organized a conference on the Problems of the Negro and Negro Youth, and fought to end discrimination and lynching. In 1940, she became vice president of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored Persons (NAACP), a position she held for the rest of her life. As a member of the advisory board that in 1942 created the Women’s Army Corps, Bethune ensured it was racially integrated. Appointed by President Harry S. Truman, Bethune was the only woman of color at the founding conference of the United Nations in 1945. She regularly wrote for the leading African American newspapers, the Pittsburgh Courier and the Chicago Defender.

Additionally, Bethune was a businesswoman who co-owned a Daytona, Florida resort and co-founded the Central Life Insurance Company of Tampa. In her “Last Will and Testament,” which was a penned reflection on her life, she wrote, “I leave you a thirst for education. Knowledge is the prime need of the hour.”

After school I took Jack with me to Castle Rock for shopping at the Emporium and a Harriet hike around the park. We found some dog cookies on one of the Christmas trees, WagnWash hosted the tree and gave away the cookies (great idea.)

At 5 we went over to King Soopers to host a food drive for a local food bank. One other family showed up to help. At first there was nothing in the basket, but after an hour the basket was full to the brim. We didn’t do as well the 2nd hour (5-6pm seems to be prime time.) One guy came out and put bag after bag in the basket, a Soopers worker gave us $3 and we bought some rice with that. I timed the date well because the food bank is only open on Tuesdays, so everything will get dropped off tomorrow.

#famouswomen

Margaret Jacobs

Jacobs, a Mohawk recipient of the Harpo Foundation’s prestigious Native American Residency Fellowship, is one of the only artists on this list who works almost exclusively in one style: abstract metal sculpture. Her works are emotive and sharp, edged with knowledge and heavy with history — but they’re not violent or threatening.

She uses contemporary alloyed materials, including steel and pewter, to question how cultures adapt to the art world, Jacobs told Mic. This use of steel is particularly layered with meaning; it references not only strength and resistance, but the weight of culture and the famed Mohawk Ironworkers (Today, there are about 200 Mohawk ironworkers working in the New York area, out of 2,000 structural ironworkers, according to the union. Most still travel home to Canada on weekends. In 1949, New Yorker writer Joseph Mitchell described Mohawks as “the most footloose Indians,” “Virtually every skyscraper … has been built by Mohawk and other Iroquois ironworkers including the new Time Warner building…Rockefeller Center, Empire State building, Chrysler, all these skyscrapers, virtually all the bridges,” said Robert Venables, a historian and former Director of Cornell University’s American Indian studies program.)

When asked about the way her work reflects the relationship between Natives and the United States, Jacobs said, “There is such a complex relationship between Natives and the U.S. and I think that for survival we have to figure out how to adapt to a contemporary world without losing the essence of culture and meaning. This is one of the major ideas that I am exploring in my work.”

Tuesday –

Things you can’t do on blood thinners.

-use a razor
-brush your teeth too hard
-say ‘Bloody hell! (unless you’re Australian)
-do dangerous things (ice skating, skiing, juggling knives)
-hike in places without cell service <—-I do this all the time, hey some places just can’t get a signal around here
-have surgery without contacting your special pharmacist
-get in an accident (really? That’s why they’re called ‘accidents’ not ‘on-purposes’)
-lie down for 30 minutes after you take the meds (I don’t know why about that one.)
-sit for too long, stand for too long
-eat kale (ok, that one I made up)

We did a bit of school then headed downtown to the Boettcher hall for the Colorado Symphony’s Beethoven’s birthday concert. It would be his 250th birthday and the concert had his music and some of his friends who might have attended his birthday bash. It was nice because we knew most of the music being played and we had great seats.

After the concert we went to Mango House to eat lunch. It’s a refugee assistance food hall/clinic/youth area/place to sell wares. We had sushi, African and Nepalese food and there were 2 or 3 more stalls that we didn’t try. It’s good food because it’s made by people from that country, the city set them up with a stall and Square (yay, credit!) I can’t wait to go back. We ran home, I dropped the girls off and went by the food bank and unloaded 20 bags of food. Then I made it to my doc appointment with 1 minute to spare. We went over general stuff, the CT scan, the meds and I now have a hematologist and medicine specialist added to my care team. They only thing that was blah was that if the DVT is not genetic, then it’s idiopathic (like my heart condition) and in that case I might be on blood thinners (pills not shots) for a long time. I dropped Hannah at Police Explorers (tonight’s topic – theft and robbery) and Jack and I did the rest of my Harriet hike at the park in Parker, in the dark.

 

RiNo, Friday

#famouswomen

Yayoi Kusama 1929-

“A polka-dot has the form of the sun, which is a symbol of the energy of the whole world and our living life, and also the form of the moon, which is calm. Round, soft, colorful, senseless and unknowing. Polka-dots become movement … Polka dots are a way to infinity.”

Raised in Matsumoto, Kusama trained at the Kyoto School of Arts and Crafts in a traditional Japanese painting style called nihonga. Kusama was inspired, however, by American Abstract impressionism. She moved to New York City in 1958 and was a part of the New York avant-garde scene throughout the 1960s, especially in the pop-art movement.

Yayoi Kusama was a leader in the avant-garde movement soon after moving to the U.S. in her twenties and is said to have influenced artists such as Andy Warhol. She is also part of the minimalist and feminist art movements. Kusama is known for her red polka-dot art, a thought-provoking yet whimsical theme she has turned single-handedly into her own signature genre. She is known for her installation art, and she has turned everything from entire rooms to living tree trunks into red polka-dot canvasses. In 2008, one of her works sold at a Christies New York auction for $5.1 million a record for a living female artist at that time. Once you’ve seen her art, you really cannot forget it. Kusama is candid about her struggle with mental illness and lives in Japan at the Seiwa Hospital in Tokyo from where she commutes to her studio to produce art.

After school we headed to RiNo for lunch at Denver central market. After eating we walked to Visible’s interactive art/ad piece called Phonetopia.

It was like going inside of your phone from sliding the door to unlock the entrance to sliding into a pit of DM’s, pushing notifications out of the way and climbing over and under ropes to avoid notifications. In the game room Hannah won 3 things in the claw machine, we had tea and water in the airplane lounge and grabbed some free stuff (water bottle, pins, glass cleaner, pop socket) at the end. It was fun, free and I do like Visible’s logo (a smiley face.)

This is a pop-up ad, so it goes away on the 24th. We walked around to look at some of the graffiti and that was my Harriet hike for the day.

Back at home I took Jack out for a quick walk, then met James at Adelitas’s for dinner. It was tamale Thursday – $2 tamales. It was a TNO, but no one showed up – more tamales for me.

Friday

#famouswomen

(Elizabeth Cochran) Nellie Bly 1864-1922

As a young girl Elizabeth often was called “Pinky” because she so frequently wore that color. As she became a teenager she wanted to portray herself as more sophisticated, and so dropped the nickname and changed her surname to “Cochrane”. She attended boarding school for one term, but after her father’s death in 1870 or 1871, was forced to drop out due to lack of funds. In 1880, Cochrane’s mother moved her family to Pittsburgh. A newspaper column entitled “What Girls Are Good For” in the Pittsburgh Dispatch that reported that girls were principally for birthing children and keeping house prompted Elizabeth to write a response under the pseudonym “Lonely Orphan Girl”. The editor, George Madden, was impressed with her passion and ran an advertisement asking the author to identify herself. When Cochrane introduced herself to the editor, he offered her the opportunity to write a piece for the newspaper, again under the pseudonym “Lonely Orphan Girl”. Her first article for the Dispatch, entitled “The Girl Puzzle”, was about how divorce affected women. In it, she argued for reform of divorce laws. Madden was impressed again and offered her a full-time job and the pen name ‘Nellie Bly.’ Bly wrote eloquently about labor laws, women’s rights, and political corruption in Mexico.

Later, while working for The New York World, Bly had herself committed to a mental institution for 10 days to investigate the conditions. Her shocking report on the facility’s rotten food, vermin infestation, and horrific abuse of inmates led to public outcry and helped reform the care of the mentally ill.

In 1889, Bly had the newspaper send her on a race around the world inspired by Jules Verne’s Around the World in Eighty Days. With a tiny travel bag and one dress, Bly made her way by ship, train, horse, and rickshaw from England to Italy, Egypt to Singapore (where she bought a monkey). When she arrived home on January 25, 1890, Bly set the record for circumnavigating the world in 72 days. She later married and became an inventor, registering several patents under her name.

After school I dropped Hannah and Malia off at Target and Grace, Jack and I went to HS skate. Grace got a good 1.5 hours of skating in and I read my book (and Jack slept.)

When we got home I took Jack on our Harriet hike by the Platte river. Day 15 of Harriet hikes. I’ve walked 27.5 miles in 15 days. Since 11/1 I’ve had no soda/coffee/caffeine. Besides some almond milk in my cereal, water is my only drink. I’ve lost 7 lbs. All I intended to do was walk 30 min a day, that challenge was a good kick in the butt! (Of course the knee shots are helping too.)

After James got home we left for Englewood Grand to see Sam at her going away party. She’s moving to Alabama to live on a cotton farm near the coast with her flower shop owning boyfriend. It sounds like a great adventure.

Pixar, jazz

#famouswomen

Eliza Burton “Lyda” Conley 1889-1946

In July of 1843, 664 Wyandotte Nation citizens were moved from Ohio to Kansas. While camped along the Missouri River, illness swept through the camps and 50 to 100 people died. Their bodies were carried across the river to the Kansas Territory, to a ridge which overlooked the Kansas and Missouri Rivers Huron Indian Cemetery was established to bury the bodies. A few years, the Wyandotte were granted the land including the ridge and used as a cemetery. By the 1890s, the Huron Indian Cemetery was prime land and developers, wanting to purchase the cemetery land, negotiated with the Wyandotte Nation in Oklahoma. In 1906, the Secretary of the Interior was instructed to sell the land with the remains to be moved to the Quindío Cemetery. Four years prior Eliza Burton “Lyda” Conley, a Wynandotte Nation tribal citizen and one of the first women attorneys- graduated from Kansas City School of Law in 1902 and became the first woman admitted to the Kansas bar.

The sale of the Wyandotte Nation’s sacred burial ground to the U.S. federal government in 1906 upset Eliza “Lyda” Conley, who was a member of the tribe. Her mother and ancestors were buried on the sacred ground. So she and sisters launched a campaign to protect and preserve the Huron Cemetery in Kansas City. They took up camp just outside the cemetery, nicknamed “Fort Conley”, padlocked the gate, took turns standing guard with muskets drawn, and put up signs that read “Trespass at Your Peril.”

Conley’s stood her ground for years. And in 1909, her fight to protect her tribe’s sacred land went all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court. That year, Conley put her legal skills to work and became the only third woman, the second female attorney, and the first Native American woman to argue a case in front of the Supreme Court. Many believe her case, in which she argued that Native American burial grounds were entitled to federal protection, was the first of its kind, too. Sadly, the Supreme Court dismissed Conley’s case. But nevertheless, she persisted. And in 1916, the cemetery was designated a federal park. Today, the cemetery—renamed Wyandot National Burial Ground—enjoys National Historic Landmark status. Conley was laid to rest in the cemetery following her death in 1946.

After school we went to the DMNS for the Pixar field trip. I think I’ve found the new best day/time for homeschool field trips – Tuesday afternoons after 1:30pm. We had the whole exhibit to ourselves. There were lots of hands-on things to do, make a stop motion video, build a character, look at the art, work the lighting, videos about working at Pixar.

The Extreme sports exhibit was also empty, the best thing in there was the ninja training course.

We could have spent more time walking around, but I needed to wear out Jack so the girls could watch him while James and I went on a LAPOMPE jazz date night. My Harriet hike was around the block and Marcy park.

Union station was all decorated.

We had a good time listening to jazz, enjoying drinks, then eating at The Kitchen (where I had a curry bowl that I’m making into a Thanksgiving side dish because it was so good.)

Planetarium and Garden of the gods

Famous women

Irena Sendler’s heroic actions were forgotten by most of the world until 2000, when four girls at Uniontown High School in Kansas decided to research her life as part of a history assignment.

Sendler was a Polish Catholic, and her surgeon father raised her to think of the Jewish people as equals. When the Nazis invaded in 1939, she was working as an administrator in the Warsaw Social Welfare Department, where homeless people and orphans were provided with food and shelter. Sendler immediately decided, on her own initiative, to begin a covert mission to supply food, medicine, and money to any Jews in need of them. She knew this would be illegal under Nazi rule, so she signed the Jews up under Christian names. To keep the authorities away, she told them that anyone who was signed up to receive aid had highly infectious typhus. While the Jews lived under false identities, Sendler kept their real ones in jars buried under an apple tree in her neighbor’s yard.

Once the Warsaw Ghetto was established, the Jews inside began dying at a rate of 5,000 per month from starvation or disease. Sendler entered the ghetto daily disguised as a nurse, convincing Jewish parents to let her smuggle their children to safety. She is credited with personally saving the lives of 2,500 children, spiriting them out of the ghetto under false names and giving them to adoptive families, orphanages, and convents. She hid some in wheelbarrows full of clothes or food and gave one infant to a man to smuggle out in his toolbox. Others were taken out hidden in coffins and burlap potato sacks.

On October 20, 1943, the Gestapo finally figured out what Irena was up to and arrested her. They smashed her feet and legs until all the bones were broken, but she refused to divulge any names. They sentenced her to death, but her friends bribed one of the guards to let her go, and she spent the rest of the war in hiding. ​After the war she dug up the jars and used the notes to track down the 2,500 children she placed with adoptive families and to reunite them with relatives scattered across Europe. But most lost their families during the Holocaust in Nazi death camps.

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We dropped Jack at puppy daycare and went to the Air Force Planetarium for the Eclipses and phases of the moon show. I had 13 families sign up (it was free), but only 6 show up (lots of excuses, but really when things are free people tend to wake up and go – oh, I don’t feel like driving, waking up my kids, etc.)

Anyway, the show was great, it was cool to see a visual of the phases of the moon and how eclipses happen. After the show we had another 40 minutes of general astronomy, the night sky, flying around to different planets and flying around Colorado with Google maps (but on a 50ft dome screen, so it looked neat.) After the shows some people stayed there to eat lunch, some came back for the next free show (Auroras), some went hiking. We went to lunch, then to Garden of the gods for a Harriet hike.

Back at home we made dinner and then Hannah went to Police Explorers. They were talking about theft, robbery, domestic violence and various other crimes. That’s two meetings down, three to go to be vetted to getting in the group and getting a uniform.

Zoo

Hannah has been getting out early and doing a 30 minute walk/jog since the 1st and going on a Harriet hike with me and she went to the gym the other night! I think the Harriet hike challenge was a good kick in the butt. I have more famous women than there are days in November, so I might end up saving some of them.

Fanny Cochrane Smith 1834-1905

Australia’s Advocate For Aboriginal Language Preservation.
Born on December 1834 in Flinders Island in Tasmania, Fanny Cochrane Smith was best known as an Aboriginal linguist. She devoted her life to preserving as much of Aboriginal heritage as she could. From 1899 to 1903, now in her late 60s, she used wax cylinders to record Tasmanian Aboriginal songs and speech, which to this day are the only original recordings in existence. Five cylinders were cut, however by 1949 only four remained as “A fifth cylinder, on which was recorded the translation of the songs, was broken some time ago”. Fanny Cochrane Smith dedicated her final years to preserving her heritage, her culture, and her history. You can hear a clip of one of the recordings here – https://aso.gov.au/…/music/fanny-cochrane-smith-songs/clip1/

Today was the Zoo co-op. We broke into groups and went around the zoo looking at animals and writing notes about them.

Then we gathered back as a big group and learned about Linnaeus’ classification system and we used this site ( https://animaldiversity.org/?fbclid=IwAR1AwagAE1oM9sGbGJwQFzsyWmSv1n6Aq9XRsJp8mQfdoPJg3gNI8yzkWdU) to find out the correct classification after we spent some time trying to classify them ourselves. We learned that a hippo is more related to a mountain goat and gerenuk than to a rhino!

We finished up and went to see some more animals before heading home. I counted the 2.4 miles walked as our Harriet hike.

Week

It seems that there is little time these days. I wake up and it’s Friday, the week flew by again. Monday we had a Denver Police dept. tour, it was the video production area (and offices in that building, but it’s not THE police station, just offices.) It was cool to see the video guy in action, he taped the kids with a green screen and they got to add in the background. Hannah got a card from an officer and everyone got DPD dog tags, which was pretty cool.

It was Hallowteen night at the DMNS museum, Brad and Janet did not win the costume contest.

Tuesday we took Grace up to Keystone for the H2O science school. She was a bit nervous at being around total strangers, but then found out some of the kids were at the teen night and one girl used to be in our homeschool group. She ended up having a great time, making friends, getting to talk to water people, sampling and having some time without us. Hannah finally got to go to an Explorer meeting, they were working on combat care and tourniquets. She decided that Parker is a good fit and has to go to at least 5 meetings before getting her uniform and equipment. They let them wear fake guns on their belt and other tools on the belt to get used to the weight and feel of it, so that’s cool. I doubt there will be 4 meetings coming up (with breaks and they only go every other week) so it might be January before she gets her stuff.

Wednesday Hannah did school and then we watched the rest of season 2 of The Good Doctor and caught up on season 3. It started snowing right as I was dropping her at church. We ended up getting about 4 inches, but the roads were fine.

Thursday we did school and went up to get Grace. The road was fine with a few exceptions of packed snow on the road. I was worried about the road to the school, which was pretty snowy on Tuesday, but the plow had been by and packed it down (the road is dirt, so it never gets plowed to the bottom.) Jack had time to play in the snow before Grace showed up. We somehow made it to Westminster for the school Winter social in record time. Grace changed into her Janet costume and bam – they won the High school most original costume. The prize was an i-tunes card which Hannah turned into Psych the Movie and a few songs. We chilled for a bit, made dinner and then drove to the mall to walk around.

Friday I took James to work, we did school, grabbed water samples for October and drove out to Cottonwood farms. I wanted to wait until Tuesday, but it’s supposed to snow Sunday-Wednesday, so we went today. The corn did not grow this year for some odd reason, so the maze was easy for anyone over 3 feet tall. The girls picked out 2 big pumpkins and we took some pictures.

Last week

A friend told me that she hadn’t been seeing pictures in posts, so hopefully that is working now. It seems there was something with Google photos that turned off sharing, so every photo I linked to wasn’t showing up. This is a quick hodgepodge of 10/5-13.

Over the weekend we went to a performance of Shakespeare in the parking lot, Midsummer’s Night Dream. It was abridged, but they packed a lot of the story into 45 minutes.

Sunday we went to The Lazy Dog and Jack was waiting on his food. He never eats the peas and carrots, but this time he spit come of them outside the bowl.

Hannah was working on her flower art on coffee.

I found pumpkin rolls on sale for 50 cents!

Dinners – pork tenderloin and stuffed mushrooms, sweet potato and black bean street tacos, sloppy joes, crockpot chicken and dumplings, burgers with butternut squash, ?

Sweet Potato and Black Bean Tacos with Avocado Crema

8 cups Diced Sweet Potato
3 Tablespoons Olive Oil, Divided
3 teaspoons Cumin, Divided
1 teaspoon Chili Powder
1 Small Onion, Finely Diced
3 cloves Garlic, Minced
2 cans (15 Oz. Size) Black Beans, Drained And Rinsed
1 Lime, Juiced
8 Corn Tortillas

FOR THE AVOCADO CREMA:
1 Avocado
1 cup Mexican Crema
1/2 cup Cilantro
2 cloves Garlic
1 teaspoon Salt
1 Tablespoon Lime Juice

Heat oven to 400ºF. Line a sheet pan with foil. Spread sweet potato on the sheet pan, drizzle with 2 tablespoons of olive oil and sprinkle with 1 teaspoon cumin and chili powder. Toss until evenly coated. Bake in the oven for 45 minutes or until potatoes are tender.

While potatoes roast in the oven, heat remaining 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a large nonstick skillet. Add onions and garlic, sauté until fragrant, about 5 minutes. Add black beans, remaining cumin, and lime juice. When potatoes are done, add them to the beans and mix until well combined.

Combine avocado, crema, cilantro, garlic, salt, and lime juice in a blender. Blend until smooth. Top with cilantro and cotija cheese.

Monday we did school, then went to HS skate, dogs aren’t allowed in there – but Jack is!

Tuesday was Creativity club and another family showed up.

I wasn’t able to work on my geode painting, but I was able to practice carving leaves, it’s hard to do curves.

Ball time!

Grace is making smaller pictures of some of her art, she’s hoping to stake out a corner for the next Santa Fe art walk and sell some stuff.

Coffee shop school.

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School today – The quantum atom, correlation coefficients, Petrarch’s Sonnets, Forensics blood spatter discussion, Criminal Justice lab q’s, Astronomy lab q’s, History Greece to Rome, Earth Science plate tectonics, slope. Ted talk about prison systems. 

Thursday it snowed and I tried to take James to work, we got all the way to Golden, but the roads were so bad he didn’t want me driving back home alone – so we came back home and he worked here.

Snow in Golden.

Jack was happy to go play in the snow.

School today – Criminal Justice (jails, prisons and community corrections), Earth Science (minerals), Algebra (slope intercept form), History (Roman society), English (write an analysis), Astronomy (webquest, galaxies.)

Forensics (trace evidence, hair and fibers ), Practical math (linear regression), Chemistry (atomic structure), British Lit (role of the supernatural in Shakespeare’s plays)

And Vi Hart just because – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CruQylWSfoU&feature=youtu.be

Jack checking the perimeter for squirrels in the snow.

Bethany came in Friday and took the girls to IHOP while I was at HS skate (just chatting.) I met them at the mall and Jack waited and waited.

The girls played games and watched TV. Saturday we went to the Arvada festival of scarecrows and did lunch at Saltgrass.

After lunch and getting Bethany a new phone she went to a friend’s house, the girls watched some TV and hung out with friends. Sunday we went to church, Hannah made coffee, I finished my book, Bethany worked on her book and we went to Connections church fall fest. Grace was working the face painting booth, Hannah carved her go-to throwing up pumpkin (and won a $10 Sbux card) and Jack had fin eating things off the ground.

We chilled back at home until Bethany left to go back to Grand Junction. Grace was painting, Hannah and her friend were hanging out and I took a nap. James and I went out to dinner at Perry’s while the girls watched Jack. It was a nice date night with dinner and drinks. Back at home we watched the next Glitch and season 3 is posing interesting questions.

Oh, the weeks are flying by , this week – Fall break day, TNO, school, Shakespeare in the parking lot (Romeo and Juliet), poe-tea, Parker police explorers meeting, Doc (me blood work and x-rays), TDO, Geeks who read @ library, Paint like Alma co-op, planetarium show/Manitou (rescheduled from last week), Zoey’s pet parade, working at Riize (Hannah), church, Fall Flannel Fest, working at church (Grace)

Dinners this week (starting tomorrow)- ham/mushroom/swiss quiche, pinto beans and rice with cornbread, lemon chicken and asparagus, shepherd’s pie, sausage and spaghetti, BBQ chicken and corn on the cob.

A Scotsman’s Shepherds Pie

5 cups mashed, boiled potatoes
1/2 cup sour cream
2 ounces cream cheese
2 tablespoons butter, softened, divided
1 egg yolk
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 1/2 teaspoons olive oil
1 pound ground lamb
1 pinch salt and ground black pepper to taste
1 (16 ounce) can stewed tomatoes with juice, chopped
1 small onion, chopped
1 small carrot, peeled and chopped
1/2 cup peas
1 cup Irish stout beer (such as Guinness®)
1 cube beef bouillon
1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
3/4 cup shredded sharp Cheddar cheese
2 teaspoons chopped fresh parsley
2 teaspoons smoked paprika

Stir potatoes, sour cream, cream cheese, 1 tablespoon butter, egg yolk, 1/2 teaspoon salt, and 1/2 teaspoon black pepper together in a bowl until smooth.

Heat olive oil in a cast iron skillet or nonstick pan over medium-high heat. Add ground lamb, reduce heat to medium, and cook, stirring frequently, until browned and crumbly, 4 to 5 minutes. Pour off excess grease and season lamb with salt and black pepper to taste. Stir tomatoes with juice, onion, and carrot into ground lamb; simmer until vegetables are tender, 5 to 10 minutes. Add peas, reduce heat to low, and cook, stirring frequently, until peas are warmed, 2 to 3 minutes.

Heat beer in a saucepan over medium heat; add beef bouillon. Cook and stir beer mixture until bouillon is dissolved, about 5 minutes. Add in 1 tablespoon butter, whisk flour into butter until thick and paste-like, about 1 minute. Stir gravy into lamb mixture and simmer until mixture is thickened, at least 5 minutes.

Set oven rack about 6 inches from the heat source and preheat the oven’s broiler. Grease a 9×12-inch baking dish.
Pour lamb mixture into the prepared baking dish. Carefully spoon mashed potatoes over lamb mixture, covering like a crust. Sprinkle Cheddar cheese, parsley, and paprika over mashed potatoes. Broil in the preheated oven until crust is browned and cheese is melted, 4 to 5 minutes. Cool for about 5 minutes before serving.