Wed, Thur, Fri

#famouswomen

Alice Coachman 1923-2014

At the 1948 London Olympics, Alice Coachman won the high jump for the United States, becoming the first black woman to win an Olympic Gold medal. King George VI awarded her medal, and subsequently, President Harry S. Truman congratulated her at a White House ceremony. Coachman was also celebrated in a motorcade that traveled from Atlanta to her hometown of Albany, Georgia.

As a child, Coachman was forbidden from training at athletic fields with white people, which forced her to get creative: she would use ropes and sticks as high jumps, running barefoot. Despite these barriers, she was able to be the first black woman to win an Olympic medal and the first black person to receive an endorsement deal.

“If I had gone to the Games and failed, there wouldn’t be anyone to follow in my footsteps. It encouraged the rest of the women to work harder and fight harder,” Coachman told The New York Times in 1996. And indeed, she paved the way for African-American athletes like Wilma Rudolph, Evelyn Ashford, Florence Griffith Joyner, and many more.

Dog school.

We tried to go sit in on a court case, but the only open ones said ‘No children’ and this one looked like it had a case on the docket, but no one showed up. The clerk said to come earlier next time.

My Harriet hike was at the gym because I waited too long and it got dark and cold.

#famouswomen

Rosalind Franklin 1920-1958

Rosalind Elsie Franklin was born in London, England. Her family was well-to-do and both sides were very involved in social and public works. Rosalind was extremely intelligent and she knew by the age of 15 that she wanted to be a scientist. Her father actively discouraged her interest since it was very difficult for women to have such a career. However, with her excellent education from St. Paul’s Girls’ School, one of the few institutions at the time that taught physics and chemistry to girls, Franklin entered Cambridge University in 1938 to study chemistry.

Franklin’s next career move took her to Paris. An old friend introduced her to Marcel Mathieu who directed most of the research in France. He was impressed with Franklin’s work and offered her a job as a “chercheur” in the Laboratoire Central des Services Chimiques de l’Etat. Here she learned X-ray diffraction techniques from Jacques Mering.
In 1951, With her knowledge, Franklin was to set up and improve the X-ray crystallography unit at King’s College. Maurice Wilkins was already using X-ray crystallography to try to solve the DNA problem at King’s College. Franklin arrived while Wilkins was away and on his return, Wilkins assumed that she was hired to be his assistant. It was a bad start to a relationship that never got any better.

Working with a student, Raymond Gosling, Franklin was able to get two sets of high-resolution photos of crystallized DNA fibers. She used two different fibers of DNA, one more highly hydrated than the other. From this she deduced the basic dimensions of DNA strands, and that the phosphates were on the outside of what was probably a helical structure.
She presented her data at a lecture in King’s College at which James Watson was in attendance. Watson and Crick were at the Cavendish Laboratory and had been working on solving the DNA structure. Franklin did not know Watson and Crick as well as Wilkins did and never truly collaborated with them. It was Wilkins who showed Watson and Crick the X-ray data Franklin obtained. The data confirmed the 3-D structure that Watson and Crick had theorized for DNA. In 1953, both Wilkins and Franklin published papers on their X-ray data in the same Nature issue with Watson and Crick’s paper on the structure of DNA.

Franklin left Cambridge in 1953 and went to the Birkbeck lab to work on the structure of tobacco mosaic virus. She published a number of papers on the subject and she actually did a lot of the work while suffering from cancer. She died from cancer in 1958. In 1962, the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded to James Watson, Francis Crick, and Maurice Wilkins for solving the structure of DNA. The Nobel committee does not give posthumous prizes.

The girl went to a cooking class (pumpkin pasta, salad and homemade ranch dressing) so I took Jack for a Harriet hike along the Cherry creek trail, it was cold.

#famouswomen

Elizabeth Blackwell 1821-1910

The first woman in America to receive a medical degree, Elizabeth Blackwell championed the participation of women in the medical profession and ultimately opened her own medical college for women. Born near Bristol, England on February 3, 1821, Blackwell was the third of nine children of Hannah Lane and Samuel Blackwell, a sugar refiner, Quaker, and anti-slavery activist. Blackwell’s famous relatives included brother Henry, a well-known abolitionist and women’s suffrage supporter who married women’s rights activist Lucy Stone; Emily Blackwell, who followed her sister into medicine; and sister-in-law Antoinette Brown Blackwell, the first ordained female minister in a mainstream Protestant denomination.

In 1832, the Blackwell family moved to America, settling in Cincinnati, Ohio. In 1838, Samuel Blackwell died, leaving the family penniless during a national financial crisis. Blackwell was inspired to pursue medicine by a dying friend who said her ordeal would have been better had she had a female physician. Most male physicians trained as apprentices to experienced doctors; there were few medical colleges and none that accepted women, though a few women also apprenticed and became unlicensed physicians.

While teaching, Blackwell boarded with the families of two southern physicians who mentored her. In 1847, she returned to Philadelphia, hoping that Quaker friends could assist her entrance into medical school. Rejected everywhere she applied, she was ultimately admitted to Geneva College in rural New York, however, her acceptance letter was intended as a practical joke.

Blackwell faced discrimination and obstacles in college: professors forced her to sit separately at lectures and often excluded her from labs; local townspeople shunned her as a “bad” woman for defying her gender role. Blackwell eventually earned the respect of professors and classmates, graduating first in her class in 1849. She continued her training at London and Paris hospitals, though doctors there relegated her to midwifery or nursing. She began to emphasize preventative care and personal hygiene, recognizing that male doctors often caused epidemics by failing to wash their hands between patients.

In 1851, Dr. Blackwell returned to New York City, where discrimination against female physicians meant few patients and difficulty practicing in hospitals and clinics. With help from Quaker friends, Blackwell opened a small clinic to treat poor women; in 1857, she opened the New York Infirmary for Women and Children with her sister Dr. Emily Blackwell and colleague Dr. Marie Zakrzewska. Its mission included providing positions for women physicians. During the Civil War, the Blackwell sisters trained nurses for Union hospitals.

In 1868, Blackwell opened a medical college in New York City. A year later, she placed her sister in charge and returned permanently to London, where in 1875, she became a professor of gynecology at the new London School of Medicine for Women. She also helped found the National Health Society and published several books, including an autobiography, Pioneer Work in Opening the Medical Profession to Women (1895).

Friday it snowed.

After school I took Jack to the HIgh line canal for a walk.

He was nappy after that.

Trunk or Treat, SNOW, Opera, Halloween, Harriet hikes, weekend

Sunday was Trunk or Treat at church, snow had started falling, so they made the decision to have it indoors. Jack went as a dinosaur and the girls were helping with the kids games.

Jack ended up sleeping on my lap for almost the whole time. James was settled in Vegas by this time, getting ready for the start of his conference. It started to snow, so after getting some groceries we stayed in for the night.

Goings on – James at conference, school, shovel snow…repeat, Fox theater DOTD show, Barber of Seville opera, youth group, Halloween party, Harriet hike co-op, art walk, Night at the Museums, church, working at church.

Dinners this week – Mac and cheese with chipotle chicken sausage, beef taco soup, grilled cheese and tomato soup, sushi and dumplings, chicken fajitas, tikka masala meatballs with fried garbanzo beans, grilling stuff.

Monday morning, I heard the traffic was horrible. Lots of wrecks, icy streets, we stayed home.

We got Jack’s photos in from the pet parade, this one is cute.

This one, not so much.

This one is mine!

Jack had a lazy snow day.

We didn’t get the amount of snow that they thought, only 4 inches or so. But, another round of snow was coming on Tuesday/Wed. It came earlier than people thought, so some schools started the day on time, but ended early. Some schools took a snow day and CDOT was telling people that if they could leave work early (or not come into work at all), this was the day to do it. We had nowhere to be, so we just chilled at home.

We ended up with a few more inches, so maybe 7 total. Wednesday was our DOTD show, but I had stayed up watching the news and Aurora and Denver both called a snow day for Wednesday, so I knew the show would be canceled – it was.

Hannah was aching to get out, so we went to the mall. Youth group was canceled, and I was wondering if the Opera would be too – but it wasn’t.

Barber of Seville was amazing. The singing, the acting, the set and costumes – brilliant. Our student matinee seats were $12/15 and I looked up the price of our seats for the next show, $225 each – who can afford that?!

Thursday we did school and went to the library for a Halloween party. The girls trick or treated with M at night and we went to the Mansion for last stop.

Friday was my Harriet Tubman co-op and the first day of Harriet hikes (Girl Trek and Walk2Connect are doing 30 days of Harriet hikes to promote the movie.) We read 2 books about Harriet, watched a video, listened to a song and did some worksheet activities. We talked about slavery, the North and South, the Underground Railroad, Talking quilts, codes and the things that Harriet Tubman did that she’s not really know for like – Union spy, a leader of an Army mission to free 700 slaves, a nurse, and a suffragist among other things. After eating some hoe cakes we went outside in the cloudy 34 degree weather and walked around the lake. This story is about the awesome trek some of the GT people made walking in the footsteps of Harriet Tubman.
https://ideas.ted.com/what-we-learned-from-walking-in-the-…/

I’m also going to be posting each day of the month about women that you should know, some of them may be familiar (like Harriet Tubman), some may have done great things – but you never heard of them.

My knees were frozen, so they didn’t hurt until late when I thawed out. We went home and Hannah went to a birthday party, Bethany had come home to visit and Grace and I gathered stuff for the Art Walk. It was only getting colder as we set up a table and Grace put her stuff on it. We got a square so it would be easier to sell things, because no one has cash anymore. She sold two mini-canvases before James showed up. Jack was wrapped up in my coat and falling asleep, but then woke up when he heard James. We grabbed some dinner from the food trucks and braved the cold for a bit longer before heading home.

Saturday -I wasn’t going to do Mrs. Ford today, but it’s appropriate because tonight is Denver’s Night at the Museums and if you haven’t been to the Black American West museum, it’s free tonight. Also, there was a tidbit in the news about her house (the museum.)

Justina Ford: Denver’s First Female African American Doctor

Justina Laurena Warren was born on January 22, 1871 in Knoxville, Illinois. Justina’s love for medicine was clear at a young age; she often dissected frogs and followed her mother, a nurse, when she saw patients. Justina went to Hering Medical School in Chicago. She married John Ford, a Baptist minister, in 1892. She continued her studies and graduated from medical school in 1899.

After her graduation, Justina was denied her medical license. The license examiner told her, “I feel dishonest taking a fee from you. You’ve got two strikes against you to begin with. First of all, you’re a lady, and second, you’re colored.” When she and John moved to Denver, racial discrimination prohibited Ford from joining the Colorado Medical Association or practicing in a hospital. So, she set up a practice in her home at 2335 Arapahoe Street.

Justina treated anyone who needed medical care, regardless of race, gender, language, citizenship, or ability to pay. Many of her patients were poor whites, African-Americans, and non-English speaking immigrants who were turned away from hospitals. Ford learned multiple languages to help treat her patients. Her patients paid her in goods, services, or money. It wasn’t until 1950 that Dr. Ford was allowed into the Colorado and American Medical Associations. Even then, she was the only female African-American doctor in all of Denver. Ford continued caring for patients until two weeks before her death on October 14, 1952. By the end of her life she had delivered almost 7,000 babies. Dr. Justina Ford’s house is now the home of the Black American West Museum.

We went to Casa Bonita for lunch and it occured to me that Casa Bonita and I will both turn 50 in just over 3 years. I had my 40th b-day party at Chuck E Cheese’s, so Casa Bonita would be a step up (I think.)

Sunday Hannah was so excited to bring her coffee painting to church (and to work at the coffee shop) that she and Bethany walked there, early, like super early, like no one was at the church early. So, James went and picked them up and they had coffee at Starbucks. Later, I took Hannah back to church and she made me a ghostly peppermint latte.

Phil was preaching on being generous.

Famous woman of the day – Wu Zetian – born 624 BC

She was the only female emperor in Chinese history. She used every ounce of her political skills and pulled Machiavellian maneuvers to gain and maintain her power. In dynastic China, Confucius deemed women unfit to rule. Nevertheless, Wu Zetian rose through the ranks in Chinese society. Wu’s intellect and beauty attracted Emperor Tai Tsung, who recruited her to his court as his concubine. After the emperor’s death, his son Kao Tsung succeeded him. Kao Tsung had been having an affair with Wu even before the death of his father. She became his second wife—a large step up from concubine—after his ascension.

Emperor Kao Tsung later died from a stroke, and Empress Wu began administrative duties in the court, eliminating and spying on those who posed an obstacle to her, and putting her youngest son into power. When her son stepped down in 690, Wu was crowned emperor of China. As emperor, Wu truly did effect change in China. She gave government positions to qualified scholars, reduced the army’s size, lowered unfair taxes on peasants, and increased agricultural production.

Bethany and Grace went to lunch by themselves, so James, Hannah and I went to Shake Shack. Back at home we watched some TV, went grocery shopping and James and I got out to my Harriet hike at Fly’n B park.

Dinners this week – rosemary pan fried chicken and risotto, beef stew, chicken quesadilla, cheeseburger macaroni, cheesy chicken and rice casserole, chinese chicken soup, black beans and sausage. (Chicken was on sale.)

Chinese Chicken Soup

2 tablespoons sesame oil
1/2 teaspoon ground turmeric
2 teaspoons chopped fresh ginger root
2 tablespoons chile paste
1 pound chopped cooked chicken breast
1 quart chicken broth
2 teaspoons sugar
1/4 cup soy sauce
1 cup chopped celery
1 (3 ounce) package ramen noodles (or egg noddles or any quick cook noodle)
1/2 cup chopped green onion

In a large pot, heat oil over medium heat. Cook turmeric, ginger and chile paste in oil until fragrant, 1 to 2 minutes. Stir in chicken, broth, sugar, soy sauce and celery. Bring to a boil, then introduce noodles and cook until noodles are done. Serve garnished with green onions.

Goings on this week – school, taxonomy co-op at the zoo, HS skate, AF Planetarium field trip, Garden of the gods hike, Parker Police Explorers, GV ride-along (Hannah), youth group, CBI forensic field trip, dentist, Riize coffee shop, Mountainview coffee shop, church, HR concert band concert.

 

The week so far

I posted this picture on Sunday, but I spoke too soon.

At the end of day 7 that ball was toast.

So, we start over.

Monday Hannah did her Earth science experiment about density, mass and volume. Basically she watched and took measurements as her ice filled rock tube fell apart.

It was Monday HS skate, which normally we would not be able to attend, but since we don’t have dance this semester we went. At first there was hardly anyone there, maybe 7 kids skating. Eventually it went up to about 23, still that is low.

Tuesday we put Jack in daycare, did school, then went downtown to the Ralph S. Carr Judicial center for a tour.

There were no cases going on in the courtrooms, but that just meant that our guide was able to talk and explain the purpose of the courts, tell us interesting things about the details in the room and note some historic people that practiced close to there (this is a pretty new building) such as Ruth Ginsberg who prosecuted a case not far from the building.

Since it’s a newer building, it has a green roof per the green roof initiative. It also has a lot of public art, since 1% of a buildings budget needs to be for art. We went up to the 4th floor, then down to the law library. The windows in the library are stained glass and each one has a historic document or type of law engraved in it (First Sumerian laws, Hammurabi’s code, Magna Carta, etc.) Also, some of the art has amendments lightly written over the picture.

The most interesting part of the tour is the learning center, a space that has interactive games and learning tools for introducing ideas about law and concepts of the same.

When we picked Jack up he had already tried to escape once – if I’m late picking him up he tries to sneak out under a big dog, sometimes he makes it, sometimes not.

Hannah and I went to an Explorer post meeting, but they just voted to change their meeting days to Wednesdays and Hannah isn’t keen on the idea of giving up every other Wednesday. So, we’re trying to find another post (looks like Parker will be our best bet.)

Wednesday was 9/11, we started the day with library school. I’m a woman of my word, they wanted a quiet space (away from Jack) to do school outside of the house once a week, they got it.

After lunch we grabbed trash bags, gloves and Jack and headed to Montbello for a Kindness Krewe day of service on 9/11. Sometimes on 9/11 we attend ceremonies, sometimes we climb stairs, sometimes we do service. I asked a friend if she knew of a place that needed cleaning, she quickly said, ‘Montbello Central park’. So, that’s why I chose that park. There were 4 other families, we grabbed bags and took off in different directions. I usually take an after picture with how many bags of trash we collected, but everyone threw away their bags before I could – but we had about 5 kitchen trash bags full and multiple small grocery bags full of trash.

When we were done we went by the Arsenal to see the bison, they just happened to be walking across the road as we drove up.

Then it was home to make dinner and off to youth group for Hannah.

Last week

Jack got shots on Monday, he was a brave boy and it didn’t seem to hurt him as much as they did last year (maybe because he’s bigger.) Bethany and Grace got in from CA and Jack went nuts, running back and forth, slipping around curves, standing still for a second, then screeching off again – you’d think the girls had been gone for a month!

Tuesday I went to a library event on Chinese calligraphy, I learned a few words and made a quick brush painting. The lady teaching us had her own stamps and came by to stamp our best work.

I wasn’t home for long before heading off again to TNO. It was at Adelita’s (taco Tuesday) and we were on the patio. James came and we had a good catch up conversation with the Dolence’s.

Wednesday was park day at Washington park. They got a new playground and it’s very nice.

Someone did show up, but we never saw them, so Grace made chalk art, Jack chased squirrels and Hannah walked around. I had to go back to my doc for another mammo, ended up that everything is fine.

Thursday Jack had a grooming appointment at Petsmart. I thought they were only taking off an inch, but he looks like baby Jack (but he is soooo soft.)

The girls had to go get shots and then I dropped them at the library to make bath bombs and lip balm.

Friday was Creativity club at the Parker library, no one showed, but Grace made some digital art and Hannah and I played Trivial Pursuit.

We had lunch at the house, then went to Golden for henna. I walked along the creek with Ann and then we sat and chatted for a while waiting on the girls.

Saturday Bethany came with us for coffee.

Later, James and I went to Globeville for the Orthodox food fair.

We had some drinks, a Russian crepe thing with meat in it and baklava. It had gotten a lot smaller than the last time we went. We lucked out on the weather, it was cloudy with a nice breeze. We took Jack by Petsmart for ice cream, then back home

Sunday we went to church, the message was on Jehoshaphat – How we handle admonishment and adversity will determine our influence and impact. Without good judgement we will find ourselves in places or relationships that are ultimately harmful to us. God is waiting to help, just let Him know that you don’t know what to do next and He’ll step in.

2 Chronicles 20:12…We don’t know what to do; we’re looking to you.

I finished reading The Leper Spy –

Started and finished this book the other day. It is a pedestrian book (like his others), but it’s wildly different. This book deals with the capturing of the Philippines, the angst of war, the liberation and freedom of the people there and how one small Filipina woman helped the US against the Japanese. There is a lot of lost history, obviously there are many individuals who were spies, resistance fighters and just average American soldiers who went above and beyond, but we don’t know everyone’s story – the story of Josefina Guerrero however was widely known in the US, but seems lost to time. I warn you though, you will have to stop reading at points to gather your emotions, the horrors of war are not glossed over (and yes, Americans also did horrible things during the war, but this book is specific to the Philippines, the Battle of Manilla, the Bataan death march, and so on.)

Joey (as she was known) had something special that allowed her to get close to the enemy and report back – leprosy. Her faith was very important to her and rather than sit in apathy at her disease, she risked everything to help free her country. She was small, but defiant, little but hugely brave in the face of danger, she was caring, bandaging wounded, closing the eyes of the dead, scrubbing the leper colony clean. She was adamant – she called on others to provide for her leper colony facilities and they came through. Hardships like leaving the country, coming to the US, getting treatment, divorcing her husband, leaving behind her daughter, just made her stronger. This woman lived so much and buried so much that when she died, no one knew about her heroism during the war. Great read to learn a little snippet of history about WWII.

M was coming over to spend the night, so we left everyone at home (except for Jack) and went to City Park Jazz. We got an awesome parking spot, the clouds rolled in so we weren’t burning up and the music was neat. Listen here or here.

Friday/weekend

The girls went whale watching, went to 3 days of Vid Con and went to Disneyland one day. They sent back a few pics along the way.

I had a good time at the concert last night, I had the Figgy Piggy sandwich from Hey PB&J, so good.

The band was a Blues type and they were really good.

Hannah and M went to the library teen geeks who read and once again got last place, but they did also walk away with free books, so that’s something.

I told Hannah Gravel pond was open, so we went swimming Friday afternoon. The water was nice, Jack sat on my lap in a tube and we floated around.

I also made him swim and look how good he is! He hates swimming, but he’s super fast.

Jack had a good nap, but he was mad when I took him out of the car to drop off Hannah at the library for another teen event.

Saturday we went to coffee at Briccy’s and walked around the park after. We saw this food truck that had a seating area on the back of the truck, that is a cool idea.

We rested for a bit, then took James to Gravel pond so he could watch Jack while Hannah and I swam. Even though Chatfield was packed, most people were at the swim beach (which I was hoping for.) I don’t know why people would rather swim in the dirty 3 ft swim beach than in the very deep, clean dog friendly pond – but fine.

I finished Bastard Brigade, Grandma Gatewood’s Walk and am somewhat through The Sacred Echo.

Finished this the other day – awesome book! It has it all, spies, atomic bombs, Nazi’s, Allies, the looming war, the world at war, after the war (although that part is very short.) The chapters are short and race you from one character to another, big names like Fermi, Heisenberg, Curie, Kennedy, Berg, Pash, Churchill, HItler, Bohr, von Braun, Roosevelt, Eisenhower – the list goes on. Brave men and women risking it all to stop the Germans from acquiring enough hard water and uranium to make a bomb, all the while ensuring that the US would be able to make one. From V-1 and 2 rockets smashing London to remote controlled airplanes with bombs utterly failing to reach their targets, to deception, cyanide pills, spies who seemed like anything but and the race to kidnap top scientists this book moves at a fast pace. Stories emerge giving backstory to people like Irene Curie (Marie Curie’s daughter) or baseball player Mo Berg (spy!) or some unflattering Kennedy pictures of the senior senator and what really happened to Joe Kennedy. A lot of the research was classified at one time or another, interviews, wiretaps, news articles, letters, diaries, the author tracks down the history and weaves it into a tale as old as time – good against evil and heroes emerging from the night to take down Goliath.

Started and finished this book today, it’s by the same author that wrote The Man Who Walked Backwards (I didn’t know this book came before that one.) The sad, but uplifting tale of Emma Gatewood, a mother of 11 children eeking out life with her seriously abusive husband until she is almost killed by him (which lands her in jail, yeah, don’t ask.) She reads a story in the early 50’s about the Appalachian trail and has a desire to be the first woman to walk the whole trail, and at age 67 in 1955 she is. She’s walked in the woods before, but this trek is fraught with danger (rain, snow, wind, low food, no water, people who think she’s with the government and won’t give her a place to rest – speaking of rest – lying on a pile of leaves or on a table, in barns, on a porch, in tumbled down shelters, etc.) She tells her children she is ‘off for a walk’ and starts out. It only takes a few hundred miles before the news catches up with her, she carries a 12 lb pack, no sleeping gear, a flashlight, bandages, some food (but she often forages or accepts food from strangers as her trek goes on.) She has no sponsors and spends $200 from start to finish and what a finish! Oh, and she didn’t just walk the trail once, she walked it through again 2 years later and one more time in sections (and also walked many other long trail trips like the Oregon trail.)

Just like in his other book the chapters are sprinkled with history of the places and times, from Harpers Ferry to the Indians that roamed the land to the coal miners and even a town populated by former German POW’s that had been interned in camps during the war. The chapters also flip-flop from her life growing up (1 of 15 children) to her marrying, the abuse she suffered, the hard farm life, raising 11 children and her walk along the trail and other walks that drew her national attention and also got people out walking again. This book is not just the story of how she drew attention to the AT that was in dire need of help, but also about the determination and strength she had. It’s about making new trails, one in her home state of Ohio, and the history of walking in general (especially in the car crazy days of the 50’s.) You can’t help but admire Grandma Gatewood and her walk that she did, ‘just for the heck of it.’

From church – Not all advice is good, take time to consider what you are given. It’s hard to rise above the level of your friends, so seek out people who are where you want to be in life and faith. Want marriage advice? Find someone who’s been married 40 years, not 40 days. If you lack wisdom, ask God for it. He loves to give gifts to His children, even when they don’t ask, but especially if they do. God is always there to help you with a decision, but He won’t make you make the decision.

We had lunch at Pho (per Hannah’s request) and then went home to chill. Later Hannah and M went to the movies and James and I took Jack to Lazy dog (he loves the burgers there.)

We watched Columbo and then went to bed.

The girls stopped in Utah for the night and will be home tomorrow.