Nutcracker and Repeal day

Photo booth from youth group last night.

I dropped Jack at puppy day camp and we went to the Colorado ballet’s Nutcracker. It was the first time we saw it with the Colorado ballet and the first time to see the whole thing (usually we see a abridged performance.)

Lunch at SAME cafe.

My new bracelet.

Then it was date night, David Lawrence from LAPOMPE was having a solo show for his new album at Ophelia’s. It was also Repeal day, so samples of prohibition whiskey and other drinks to celebrate.

TDO, food drive, symphony

#famouswomen

Mary McLeod Bethune 1875-1955

The daughter of former slaves, Mary Jane McLeod Bethune became one of the most important black educators, civil and women’s rights leaders and government officials of the twentieth century. The college she founded set educational standards for today’s black colleges, and her role as an advisor to President Franklin Delano Roosevelt gave African Americans an advocate in government.

Born on July 10, 1875 near Maysville, South Carolina, Bethune was one of the last of Samuel and Patsy McLeod’s seventeen children. After the Civil War, her mother worked for her former owner until she could buy the land on which the family grew cotton. By age nine, Bethune could pick 250 pounds of cotton a day.

Bethune benefited from efforts to educate African Americans after the war, graduating in 1894 from the Scotia Seminary, a boarding school in North Carolina. Bethune next attended Dwight Moody’s Institute for Home and Foreign Missions in Chicago, Illinois. But with no church willing to sponsor her as a missionary, Bethune became an educator. While teaching in South Carolina, she married fellow teacher Albertus Bethune, with whom she had a son in 1899. In 1904 Bethune opened a boarding school, the Daytona Beach Literary and Industrial School for Training Negro Girls. Eventually, Bethune’s school became a college, merging with the all-male Cookman Institute to form Bethune-Cookman College in 1929. It issued its first degrees in 1943.

A champion of racial and gender equality, Bethune founded many organizations and led voter registration drives after women gained the vote in 1920, risking racist attacks. In 1924, she was elected president of the National Association of Colored Women’s Clubs, and in 1935, she became the founding president of the National Council of Negro Women. A friend of Eleanor Roosevelt, in 1936, Bethune became the highest ranking African American woman in government when President Franklin Roosevelt named her director of Negro Affairs of the National Youth Administration, where she remained until 1944. She was also a leader of FDR’s unofficial “black cabinet.” In 1937 Bethune organized a conference on the Problems of the Negro and Negro Youth, and fought to end discrimination and lynching. In 1940, she became vice president of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored Persons (NAACP), a position she held for the rest of her life. As a member of the advisory board that in 1942 created the Women’s Army Corps, Bethune ensured it was racially integrated. Appointed by President Harry S. Truman, Bethune was the only woman of color at the founding conference of the United Nations in 1945. She regularly wrote for the leading African American newspapers, the Pittsburgh Courier and the Chicago Defender.

Additionally, Bethune was a businesswoman who co-owned a Daytona, Florida resort and co-founded the Central Life Insurance Company of Tampa. In her “Last Will and Testament,” which was a penned reflection on her life, she wrote, “I leave you a thirst for education. Knowledge is the prime need of the hour.”

After school I took Jack with me to Castle Rock for shopping at the Emporium and a Harriet hike around the park. We found some dog cookies on one of the Christmas trees, WagnWash hosted the tree and gave away the cookies (great idea.)

At 5 we went over to King Soopers to host a food drive for a local food bank. One other family showed up to help. At first there was nothing in the basket, but after an hour the basket was full to the brim. We didn’t do as well the 2nd hour (5-6pm seems to be prime time.) One guy came out and put bag after bag in the basket, a Soopers worker gave us $3 and we bought some rice with that. I timed the date well because the food bank is only open on Tuesdays, so everything will get dropped off tomorrow.

#famouswomen

Margaret Jacobs

Jacobs, a Mohawk recipient of the Harpo Foundation’s prestigious Native American Residency Fellowship, is one of the only artists on this list who works almost exclusively in one style: abstract metal sculpture. Her works are emotive and sharp, edged with knowledge and heavy with history — but they’re not violent or threatening.

She uses contemporary alloyed materials, including steel and pewter, to question how cultures adapt to the art world, Jacobs told Mic. This use of steel is particularly layered with meaning; it references not only strength and resistance, but the weight of culture and the famed Mohawk Ironworkers (Today, there are about 200 Mohawk ironworkers working in the New York area, out of 2,000 structural ironworkers, according to the union. Most still travel home to Canada on weekends. In 1949, New Yorker writer Joseph Mitchell described Mohawks as “the most footloose Indians,” “Virtually every skyscraper … has been built by Mohawk and other Iroquois ironworkers including the new Time Warner building…Rockefeller Center, Empire State building, Chrysler, all these skyscrapers, virtually all the bridges,” said Robert Venables, a historian and former Director of Cornell University’s American Indian studies program.)

When asked about the way her work reflects the relationship between Natives and the United States, Jacobs said, “There is such a complex relationship between Natives and the U.S. and I think that for survival we have to figure out how to adapt to a contemporary world without losing the essence of culture and meaning. This is one of the major ideas that I am exploring in my work.”

Tuesday –

Things you can’t do on blood thinners.

-use a razor
-brush your teeth too hard
-say ‘Bloody hell! (unless you’re Australian)
-do dangerous things (ice skating, skiing, juggling knives)
-hike in places without cell service <—-I do this all the time, hey some places just can’t get a signal around here
-have surgery without contacting your special pharmacist
-get in an accident (really? That’s why they’re called ‘accidents’ not ‘on-purposes’)
-lie down for 30 minutes after you take the meds (I don’t know why about that one.)
-sit for too long, stand for too long
-eat kale (ok, that one I made up)

We did a bit of school then headed downtown to the Boettcher hall for the Colorado Symphony’s Beethoven’s birthday concert. It would be his 250th birthday and the concert had his music and some of his friends who might have attended his birthday bash. It was nice because we knew most of the music being played and we had great seats.

After the concert we went to Mango House to eat lunch. It’s a refugee assistance food hall/clinic/youth area/place to sell wares. We had sushi, African and Nepalese food and there were 2 or 3 more stalls that we didn’t try. It’s good food because it’s made by people from that country, the city set them up with a stall and Square (yay, credit!) I can’t wait to go back. We ran home, I dropped the girls off and went by the food bank and unloaded 20 bags of food. Then I made it to my doc appointment with 1 minute to spare. We went over general stuff, the CT scan, the meds and I now have a hematologist and medicine specialist added to my care team. They only thing that was blah was that if the DVT is not genetic, then it’s idiopathic (like my heart condition) and in that case I might be on blood thinners (pills not shots) for a long time. I dropped Hannah at Police Explorers (tonight’s topic – theft and robbery) and Jack and I did the rest of my Harriet hike at the park in Parker, in the dark.

 

Pixar, jazz

#famouswomen

Eliza Burton “Lyda” Conley 1889-1946

In July of 1843, 664 Wyandotte Nation citizens were moved from Ohio to Kansas. While camped along the Missouri River, illness swept through the camps and 50 to 100 people died. Their bodies were carried across the river to the Kansas Territory, to a ridge which overlooked the Kansas and Missouri Rivers Huron Indian Cemetery was established to bury the bodies. A few years, the Wyandotte were granted the land including the ridge and used as a cemetery. By the 1890s, the Huron Indian Cemetery was prime land and developers, wanting to purchase the cemetery land, negotiated with the Wyandotte Nation in Oklahoma. In 1906, the Secretary of the Interior was instructed to sell the land with the remains to be moved to the Quindío Cemetery. Four years prior Eliza Burton “Lyda” Conley, a Wynandotte Nation tribal citizen and one of the first women attorneys- graduated from Kansas City School of Law in 1902 and became the first woman admitted to the Kansas bar.

The sale of the Wyandotte Nation’s sacred burial ground to the U.S. federal government in 1906 upset Eliza “Lyda” Conley, who was a member of the tribe. Her mother and ancestors were buried on the sacred ground. So she and sisters launched a campaign to protect and preserve the Huron Cemetery in Kansas City. They took up camp just outside the cemetery, nicknamed “Fort Conley”, padlocked the gate, took turns standing guard with muskets drawn, and put up signs that read “Trespass at Your Peril.”

Conley’s stood her ground for years. And in 1909, her fight to protect her tribe’s sacred land went all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court. That year, Conley put her legal skills to work and became the only third woman, the second female attorney, and the first Native American woman to argue a case in front of the Supreme Court. Many believe her case, in which she argued that Native American burial grounds were entitled to federal protection, was the first of its kind, too. Sadly, the Supreme Court dismissed Conley’s case. But nevertheless, she persisted. And in 1916, the cemetery was designated a federal park. Today, the cemetery—renamed Wyandot National Burial Ground—enjoys National Historic Landmark status. Conley was laid to rest in the cemetery following her death in 1946.

After school we went to the DMNS for the Pixar field trip. I think I’ve found the new best day/time for homeschool field trips – Tuesday afternoons after 1:30pm. We had the whole exhibit to ourselves. There were lots of hands-on things to do, make a stop motion video, build a character, look at the art, work the lighting, videos about working at Pixar.

The Extreme sports exhibit was also empty, the best thing in there was the ninja training course.

We could have spent more time walking around, but I needed to wear out Jack so the girls could watch him while James and I went on a LAPOMPE jazz date night. My Harriet hike was around the block and Marcy park.

Union station was all decorated.

We had a good time listening to jazz, enjoying drinks, then eating at The Kitchen (where I had a curry bowl that I’m making into a Thanksgiving side dish because it was so good.)

Weekend

#famouswomen

Hedy Lamarr – born Hedwig Eva Maria Kiesler 1914-2000

The Hollywood actress was an avid inventor and the person behind advances in communication technology in the 1940s that led to today’s Wi-Fi, GPS, and Bluetooth.

Like many famous stars of her day, she had a relationship with aerospace pioneer Howard Hughes. According to Dean’s film, it was more cerebral than romantic — she helped him streamline his aircraft design. In rare, long-lost cassette tapes from the 1990s, Lamarr describes her contributions to aerospace engineering: “I thought the aeroplanes were too slow. I decided that’s not right. They shouldn’t be square, the wings. So I bought a book of fish, and I bought a book of birds, and then used the fastest bird, connected it with the fastest fish. And I drew it together and showed it to Howard Hughes and then he said, ‘You’re a genius.’”Although better known for her Silver Screen exploits, She was a famous Hollywood star who would finish performing on set with Clark Gable, Jimmy Stewart, and Spencer Tracy, and then go back to her trailer and work on her inventions.

Austrian actress Hedy Lamarr became a pioneer in the field of wireless communications following her emigration to the United States. The international beauty icon developed a “Secret Communications System” to help combat the Nazis in World War II. The brilliant idea was called frequency hopping: a way of jumping around on radio frequencies in order to avoid a third party jamming your signal. Lamarr invented it in the 1940s for use as a secret wartime communication system that could keep the enemy from interfering with a ship’s torpedoes. She got a patent for it in August 1942, and then donated it to the U.S. military to help fight the Nazis. “When she gave it to them, [the Navy] said, ‘What do you want to do, put a player piano inside a torpedo? Get out of here!’ And so they didn’t use it during the Second World War. It was after the Second World War that it emerged as a way of secretly communicating on all the gadgets that we use today,” Dean explained.

By manipulating radio frequencies at irregular intervals between transmission and reception, the invention formed an unbreakable code to prevent classified messages from being intercepted by enemy personnel. The enormous significance of the invention was not realized until decades later. It was first implemented on naval ships during the Cuban Missile Crisis and subsequently emerged in numerous military applications. But most importantly, the “spread spectrum” technology that Lamarr helped to invent would galvanize the digital communications boom, forming the technical backbone that makes cellular phones, fax machines and other wireless operations possible.

Saturday we had plans, Dim Sum! We got there right at 10am and were in the back of the line, but we made it into the first seating.

We ran errands, went by the library, put up a shelf, got a new headlight and the girls and I went to a free concert – The Composer is Dead by Lemony Snicket.

James and I walked with Jack at Marcy park for a Harriet hike. My knees felt awesome!

Sunday –

#famouswomen
Sybil Ludington 1761-1839

A young American patriot, Sybil Ludington was just 16 years old when she made a night-time ride rallying Patriot soldiers.

Born in New York in 1761, Ludington was the eldest of Henry and Abigail’s twelve children. In addition to working as a farmer, Ludington’s father was a gristmill owner who served in the military for over sixty years, including during the French and Indian War. He was loyal to the British crown until 1773, when he switched sides and joined the Patriots in the American Revolution.

On April 26, 1777, Colonel Ludington received word from a rider that the nearby town of Danbury was under attack by British troops and needed help. At the time, Ludington’s regiment had disbanded for planting season, and his men were miles apart at their respective farms. With the rider too tired to continue and Colonel Ludington focused on preparing for battle, young Sybil rose to the cause. She rode all night through dark woods and in the rain, covering anywhere from 20 to 40 miles (estimates vary). By the time she returned home, hundreds of soldiers were gathering to fight the British. She was thanked by General George Washington himself, but it wasn’t until 1935 when a statue was erected in her honor that she was publicly recognized.

We went to church, Hannah worked the coffee shop, while I sat in on the next giving sermon. James grilled for lunch and Jack got a tiny cheeseburger.

Our Harriet hike today was from Belleview park to the dog park and back.

We watched some TV, made a post office run and saw this amazing sunset.

Things this week – CT scan, school, St. John’s music at noon, Pixar field trip, Union station jazz date night, Creativity club, Pupsgiving doggy day camp, youth group, RiNo pop-up field trip, TNO, HS skate, ortho, Sam’s going away at EG, ?, working at Riize and church.

Dinners this week – leftovers, navy beans and sausage with rye bread, date night (TV dinners for kids), cheese and tomato lasagna and salad, TNO (tamales for me, potstickers for kids), basil chicken with parmesan vermicelli and artichokes, meatloaf and smashed potatoes.

Smashed potatoes

24 ounces Dutch yellow baby potatoes
2 tablespoons olive oil
3 cloves garlic, pressed
1 tablespoon fresh thyme leaves
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

Preheat oven to 450 degrees F. Lightly oil a baking sheet or coat with nonstick spray. In a large pot of boiling water, cook potatoes until tender, about 15-20 minutes; drain well.
Place potatoes onto the prepared baking sheet. Using a potato masher or fork, carefully smash the potatoes until flattened but still in one piece. Top with olive oil, garlic and thyme. Place into oven and bake for 18-20 minutes, or until golden brown and crisp.
Serve immediately.

 

School, jazz, hike

Hannah had to do a potato topographical map for Earth science, it was kind of cute. The water is red instead of blue because they included red dye and she didn’t want to use our blue dye.

I took Jack on a photo/sniff walk on the canal.

Wild plums are mostly ripe, we need to go pick some to make some jam.

The girls watched Jack while James and I went to EG for jazz. Phil made me an excellent Kookaburra (root beer, absinthe, root beer liqueur.)

Wednesday we went to the library to do school, we’re planning on making that a weekly occurrence.

In the afternoon we went to the Audubon area for a hike.

Our A/C froze up last night, so it was a hot night sleeping (I think we got it down to low 80’s with the windows open, but the breeze was blowing the wrong way.) Stupid adult things one has to do, fixing A/C’s.

I finished this book – I think the most interesting thing about Audrey Hepburn’s story is not that she survived the Winter Hunger, it’s not her involvement in the Dutch resistance at age 15, it’s not her courageous escape from the back of a German van that was driving around picking up women, it’s not her iron will to dance and to work hard at something she wanted so passionately – I think the most interesting thing is her reaction to reading Anne Frank’s diary. They were soul sisters, Dutch, born a few months apart, loved to dance, lived 60 miles apart and were captive during the war. There were details in Anne’s diary that were images of Audrey’s family – 5 men shot by the Nazi’s, one of those men was Audrey’s Uncle. Audrey turned down playing Anne Frank on film because she could not relive the horror and she felt that Anne’s life was almost like that of a sister and she couldn’t play that role and honor her; it was just too close to her own war experience. Very good biography of Audrey Kathleen van Heemstra Ruston.

 

Wed, Thur, Friday

From Union Station jazz Tuesday night.

Wednesday the girls did school, I took Jack on some errands – the post office, the UPS store, the eye doc, Petsmart. Thursday James was coming back home so I cleaned the bathrooms, vaccummed, swept, cleaned the kitchen and did laundry. The girls did school and then we took the kayak and tubes to Gravel pond for some homeschool PE.

Jack and I went to pick up James and Jack went nuts in the car. He missed Daddy.

Friday we did school and Jack broke his new ball.

Hannah had a Criminal justice lab based on this TED talk –

Grace learned about a new invention that makes handling sea critters in their natural environment a breeze.

Soft Robot Gives Jellyfish A Hug

Grace and I went out to get water samples and Jack jumped right in (because there was such a big sandbar. )

Upstream.

Right bank.

Downstream.

Left bank.

Tomorrow we’re going to visit the Air Force chapel before they close it for renovations and then we’re checking out a Food hall in the Springs.

Secret swimming spot

That is not so secret any more. Now there is a day use fee, but that helps maintain the bathrooms, trash removal and the parking situation – so I guess that’s good. It was a sunny 78 degree day, so perfect for hiking and cooling off in the water.

People love to climb up and jump in – not my kids.

Not sunburned, just red from exertion.

We stopped in Manitou to play some video games, get Jack some CBD water and get some treats from Goldminer’s.

Once again we had food truck dinner and tunes at the mall.